• Tom Bechman

    Count Your Blessings and Help Those Who Need It

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on May 27, 2013

    Several years ago a good friend of mine and me both knew a mutual acquaintance who was an ag economics professor. Both of us had interviewed him in his office and written stories with him as the source. One Friday morning he was out jogging before work, like he did quite frequently, and passed away suddenly from a heart attack. Later that day, someone asked my friend how his day was going. "Well, compared to my ag economics friend, I'd say my day is going pretty…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Spring Moldboard Plowing? Really?

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on May 20, 2013

    You can dust off tillage trials by Don Griffith, a former Purdue University Extension agronomist, that date back into the 1970's and 1980's. Of all the systems studied, moldboard plowing in the spring was one that typically returned the lowest yields. Many Indiana soils are simply too heavy and wet to respond well to plowing in the spring when soils tend to have extra moisture, and clods form easily. Fast forward to 2013. Most moldboard plows are parked. A few companies still…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Why Aren't the Global Warming People Talking Now?

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on May 13, 2013

    Last year those who believe in global warming could make hay. March in Indiana was so warm it was off the charts. July brought temperatures that resembled those recorded in the 1930s. Then there's 2013 – definitely a year with a mind of its own. Forecasters called for a warm, wet spring. They got the wet part right, but up until now, at least, they missed the warm part. Maybe they believe in global warming too. I could show you about 500 high school kids who don't…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Welcome to the New Normal in Crop Farming

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on May 6, 2013

    When rains covered the state the third week of April, some with lots of acres to plant got jittery. Their grandpa would probably think they had lost their minds. When grandpa or great grandpa farmed, late April was for hauling manure, maybe plowing. Planting corn? You had to be kidding. The oak leaves weren't as big as squirrel ears yet! And planting soybeans? Call the men in the white coats! Even if your grandpa was more progressive, odds are he wouldn't dream of planting…

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