• Tom Bechman

    Ready, Set, Wait…to Plant!

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on March 25, 2013

    They say you can wait a day and the weather in Indiana will change. It's certainly a no brainer that if you wait a whole year the weather will change. Bill Johnson, a weed specialist at Purdue University, says Lafayette had four 80 degree days in March, 2012. There's barely been a half dozen days above 50, if that high, this year. No two years are the same. But that led one Newton County farmer to say recently that 'abnormal is now normal'. In other words, you never know…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Watch Out For That Door!

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on March 18, 2013

    Do you remember the Windex commercials of a few years ago where the housewife got the patio door glass shiny clean? Two talking birds, imagine that – only in a commercial – are gloating about how the door is finally open and they can swoop into the house. One takes off and barrels toward the window. He hits the glass and bounces off. The point, of course, was that the window was so clean that he thought it wasn't there. This is also the time of year when you're likely…

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  • Tom Bechman

    'The Road Not Taken' Is More Than A Poem

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on March 11, 2013

    Joy McClain writes a column called Joy's Reflections in Indiana Prairie Farmer. If you're a guy, you probably figure it's just for women and don't read it. You don't know what you're missing. Joy is starting to get requests to speak to ag groups, and there's a reason why. The stories she relates, often personal stories, hit home whether you're a man or a woman. Without totally giving away her column, here's an example that will appear in the April…

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  • Tom Bechman

    What if John Purdue Had Lived Near Bloomington?

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on March 4, 2013

    Randall Reeder from Columbus, Ohio, of all places, spoke at a conservation tillage conference at Richmond recently. He is retired as an ag engineer at Ohio State University, but still works on various projects, typically to promote no-till or the use of cover crops. He asked the audience a question that seemed whimsical on the surface, but was very thought-provoking if you actually stopped to consider it. "What if John Deere had been a chemist instead of a blacksmith?" he…

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