WSU April Livestock Health Workshops Set

Beef, sheep, poultry and goats will be discussed at WSU extension workshop.

Published on: Apr 2, 2013

Have a herd of cows that won't respect your fencing or doing other bad habits? Producers can learn more about how to keep their livestock happy and healthy at livestock and care workshops set for April 13 and 14 in Washington.

Nutritional problems and bad behavior will be among the topics discussed at the sessions set for 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on both days at the Sheriff's Posse Arena, 5421 S. Machias Rd., in Snohomish.

The University of Washington Extension courses will include the following scheduled events:

Goats: 9 a.m. April 13. Learn the basics of handling, milking, nutrition, fencing, housing and dehorning.

Sheep will be among the four livestock groups discussed during a special Washington animal care school this month in Snohomish.
Sheep will be among the four livestock groups discussed during a special Washington animal care school this month in Snohomish.

Sheep: 1 0 p.m.-3 p.m. April 13. Learn how to raise sheep for food and fiber with health as a focus in a session including tips on handling, housing and nutrition.

Poultry: 10 a.m.- noon, April 14. Learn the basics and proper are for handling all types of poultry, including egg and meat breeds, housing and nutrition.

Beef: 1 p.m.-4 p.m. April 14: Focus will be on proper handling, leading, dehorning, injection techniques, fencing and nutrition.

Workshops cost $25 per person per session, but class size is limited and preregistration is required online. Download a form  and mail it with a check or contact Karie Christensen at (425) 357-6039 or by email at christensen4@wsu.edu.

Hands-on workshops with animals will include demonstrations of hoof trimming, injecting, dehorning, halter training, nutrition and fencing. The program will be conducted by instructors who have expertise with livestock.

Those who attend will be given a CD loaded with resources for all livestock species.

The special event is held in response to reports of mishaps reported in livestock in the region, often resulting in urgent calls to veterinarians for medical care for the animals. Costly investments in livestock can end in tragedy unless proper handling techniques are practiced, say Snohomish County Extension officials.