Wheat Harvest Is Close; Time to Emphasize Safety

Busiest times can tempt even the careful to take shortcuts. Don't do it.

Published on: Jun 19, 2013

All across Kansas, kids are out of school and farm work is hitting fever pitch going into wheat harvest.

This is the time of that Farm Safety 4 Just Kids was created for – the time when everybody is in a hurry, there's lots to be done and it's easy to take shortcuts that can result in injury or even a life lost.

As wheat harvest gets going, one of the biggest areas for safety reminders is grain handling, loading and unloading. Now, just before harvest begins, is the perfect time to remind kids to stay out of grain carts and trucks and to exercise extreme care around grain bins.

The Kansas Corn Commission offers a grain bin safety video free to anyone who requests it. The video was produced on location in several states by the National Grain and Feed Foundation and the Natinal Corn Growers Association. It provides prevention tips, background data on grain bin accidents and advice on promoting awareness of grain safety on the farm.

With wheat harvest drawing near, its important to keep safety in mind. Kids love nothing more than riding in the combine or the tractor cab, but farm vehicles are safe for riders only if they have a seat and safety belt for that extra person.
With wheat harvest drawing near, it's important to keep safety in mind. Kids love nothing more than riding in the combine or the tractor cab, but farm vehicles are safe for riders only if they have a seat and safety belt for that extra person.

Professionals in the fields of grain bin safety research and rescue are interviewed in the video. It is also available for viewing on YouTube.

When weather turns threatening or time runs short, it is always temping to take chances in the name of getting the job done. The Corn Commission reminds farm families that no crop is more important than the lives of farm families.

Equipment only safe for riders if an extra seat and safety belt is available

Kids love nothing more than riding in the combine or the tractor cab, but farm vehicles are safe for riders only if they have a seat and safety belt for that extra person. Don't ride – or let others ride – on tractor fenders, hitches, attachments or implements.

Protective shields are installed at the factory to cover moving parts. Don't take them off. And when you get out of the tractor or truck, double-check to be sure that you have shut down power equipment and put the vehicle in park or engaged the emergency brake.

Routinely check hydraulic hoses and electrical cables for cracks or signs of wear I the early morning or on rainy days when equipment is not running.

Make sure there are fire extinguishers and first aid kits on all tractors and in truck and combine cabs.

Finally, remember that the commonest burns are those caused by the sun. Use sun screen generously to protect against burns and skin cancer.

For more information, check out Farm Safet For Just Kids and the National Education Center for Ag Safety.  Click on the "safety brochures" tab to download helpful information on a variety of subjects.