USDA Releases Draft FSMA Transportation Rule

Final rule in Food Safety Modernization Act released; three public meetings scheduled

Published on: Feb 3, 2014

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday proposed a sanitary transport rule in accordance with the Food Safety Modernization Act, adhering to its Jan. 31 deadline.

The rule would require certain shippers, receivers, and carriers who transport food by motor or rail vehicles to take steps to prevent the contamination of human and animal food during transportation.

The proposal marks the seventh and final major rule in the FDA FMSA's central framework aimed at systematically building preventive measures across the food system. The FSMA has been characterized as the first sweeping reform to food safety in more than 70 years.

Final rule in Food Safety Modernization Act released; three public meetings scheduled
Final rule in Food Safety Modernization Act released; three public meetings scheduled

The transport rule would establish criteria for properly refrigerating food, adequately cleaning vehicles between loads, and properly protecting food during transportation, among other safety regulations.

The proposed rule would apply to shippers, carriers, and receivers who transport food that will be consumed or distributed in the United States and is "intended to ensure that persons engaged in the transportation of food that is at the greatest risk for contamination during transportation follow appropriate sanitary transportation practices," FDA said.

Related: Legislators Push Back On Proposed FDA Rules

The requirements in the proposed rule, however, would not apply to the transportation of fully packaged shelf-stable foods, live food animals, and raw agricultural commodities when transported by farms. A more complete list of exemptions is below.

USDA Releases Draft FSMA Transportation Rule

"Truthfully, it's uncommon for a foodborne illness to be caused by contamination during transportation," FDA Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine Michael Taylor said in an FDA blog post, "but we have received reports of unsanitary practices, and we want to minimize this potential source of illness."