U of I Researchers Question Whether Potash Actually Boosts Yield

In a recent study, three U of I professors noted potash fertilization may do little to ensure crop availability.

Published on: Nov 5, 2013

The irony, according to Mulvaney, is that before 1960 there was very little usage of KCl fertilizer.

"A hundred years ago, U of I researcher Cyril Hopkins saw little need for Illinois farmers to fertilize their fields with potassium," Mulvaney says. "Hopkins promoted the Illinois System of Permanent Fertility, which relied on legume rotations, rock phosphate, and limestone. There was no potash in that system. He realized that Midwest soils are well supplied with K. And it's still true of the more productive soils around the globe. Potassium is one of the most abundant elements in the earth's crust and is more readily available than nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur. Farmers have been taught to think that fertilizers are the source of soil fertility—that the soil is basically an inert rooting medium that supports the plant."

Khan and his colleagues pointed out that KCl fertilization has long been promoted as a prerequisite for high nutritional value for food and feed. To their surprise, they found that the qualitative effects were predominantly detrimental, based on a survey of more than 1,400 field trials reported in the scientific literature.

"Potassium depresses calcium and magnesium, which are beneficial minerals for any living system," Khan explains. "This can lead to grass tetany or milk fever in livestock, but the problems don't stop there. Low-calcium diets can also trigger human diseases such as osteoporosis, rickets, and colon cancer. Another major health concern arises from the chloride in KCl, which mobilizes cadmium in the soil and promotes accumulation of this heavy metal in potato and cereal grain. This contaminates many common foods we eat—bread, potatoes, potato chips, French fries—and some we drink, such as beer. I'm reminded of a recent clinical study that links cadmium intake to an increased risk of breast cancer."

While working in the northwestern part of Pakistan three decades ago, Khan was surprised to discover another use for KCl fertilizer.

"I saw an elderly man making a mud wall from clay," Khan says. "He was using the same bag of KCl that I was giving to farmers, but he was mixing it with the clay. I asked why he was using this fertilizer, and he explained that by adding potassium chloride, the clay becomes really tough like cement. He was using it to strengthen the mud wall."

"The man's understanding was far ahead of mine and helped me to finally realize that KCl changes the soil's physical properties," Khan adds. "Civil engineers know this, too, and use KCl as a stabilizer to construct mud roads and foundations."

Mulvaney has demonstrated the cementing effect of KCl in his soil fertility class, and notes that calcium from liming has the opposite effect of softening the soil. He cautions against the buildup philosophy that has been widely advocated for decades, noting that agronomic productivity can be adversely affected by collapsing clay, which reduces the soil's capacity to store nutrients and water and also restricts rooting.

Khan and Mulvaney see no value in soil testing for exchangeable K and instead recommend that producers periodically carry out their own strip trials to evaluate whether K fertilization is needed. Based on published research cited in their paper, they prefer the use of potassium sulfate, not KCl.

The full paper is available as an open access article at http://tinyurl.com/k32msg9.

Source: University of Illinois