Trade Symposium Stop in Iowa by Chinese Encouraging For Corn Growers

NCGA is looking forward to seeing what comes from the symposium.

Published on: Feb 20, 2012

The delegation from China made a stop in Iowa last Thursday for the U.S. and China Trade Symposium. Sarah Gallo, Director of Public Policy for the National Corn Growers Association, says a lot of U.S. agricultural exports to China come from Iowa. She says the stop was significant and it is to know the Chinese delegation thought it was so important to pause and focus on the agricultural relationship between the two countries.

"We recognize that the Chinese economy is growing tremendously and its growing population can have a greater demand for agricultural commodities and livestock," Gallo said. "It's in our best interest to ensure that there is robust trade between the United States and China, that we're working together to tackle any trade barriers that might exist, and that we have a positive working relationship between not only our governments but also our agricultural producers."

Gallo says NCGA is interested in any decisions from the symposium that affect biotechnology.

"Corn growers have readily adopted plant biotechnology since its introduction in the mid '90s," Gallo said. "As more biotech traits come to market in the United States and more biotech traits are adopted by corn growers, we are certainly interested in the Chinese regulatory system, how China is approving these biotechnology traits and how that can facilitate greater trade between the United States and China."

China announced intentions to make a significant purchase of U.S. soybeans , which Gallo says is exciting and encouraging because it increases agricultural exports, which is of great interest to corn growers.

"We are encouraged and thankful to Secretary Vilsack for the amount of work that he has done in getting ready for this symposium," Gallo said. "And also his continued commitment to work with his counterpart in China to reduce trade barriers and tackle some of the most urgent needs like biotechnology and some of the livestock issues."