The Buzz: Energy Costs

Energy costs plague rural Kansas; KFB gets ready for Governor's Tour. Bill Spiegel

 

Published on: Aug 19, 2005

High fuel prices have raised the ire of Congressman Jerry Moran's First District constituents. At the Congressman's Haskell County Town Hall meeting last week, he was pummeled with questions about how the government plans to respond to high energy prices...

  • "Is someone watching these markets to see if gas companies are manipulating or increasing prices?" Moran told audience members. "Representatives have passed an energy bill that will help in the long term, but it will not do much for the short term. It is in the short term that people have to pay the bills..."

  • Moran added that he hoped Kansas farmers would one day be able to sell half their corn crop to the ethanol industry. Ethanol, he said, is 10 cents per gallon cheaper than gasoline...

  • Sedgwick County will host the annual Kansas Farm Bureau Governor's Farm and Ranch Tour August 31. Governor Kathleen Sebelius will be exposed to a host of issues, including water issues, eminent domain, urban sprawl and other facets of production agriculture. Events begin at 8:30 a.m. with breakfast at Eberly Farms. Stops include Hiland Dairy, Helton Gardens, the Gruenbacher Farm and McCurry Brothers Angus...

  • Also that day, The Agri-Business Council of Wichita - a new organization designed to advocate growth in awareness of food, fiber, agri-science and related issues in south central Kansas - will hold its first event: a reception following the Governor's Tour. The event will begin at 4:30 p.m. at Eberly Farms...

  • The council aims to provide a forum to identify and discuss the potential impact of emerging issues and opportunities and to educate elected officials. Speakers at this inaugural event will include Congressman Todd Tiahrt and K-State Agriculture Dean Fred Cholick. For information about the council or the reception, call (800) 673-0759...

  • An Internet link that you may wish to bookmark is http://soils.usda.gov/survey. That is the USDA's Web Soil Survey site, which gives users access to the national soils information system. Essentially, it is the same information you've studied in the county Soil Survey book for years, but in a Web-based format...

  • Viewers can access a variety of information on the Web site, including geographic areas of interest. Information can be downloaded, printed or saved to disk...

  • USDA reports that 95% of the country's counties are in the database, with 100% before long. Over time, the Web-based product will replace the printed version of the Soil Survey as part of the USDA's eGov initiative.