The Buzz

Ethanol, biodiesel continue to make news.

Published on: Nov 20, 2006

Dodge City could be getting into the ethanol business in a big way. An Omaha company, Dial Resources, announced plans to build a 200 million gallon ethanol plant near Dodge City, with construction that could begin as early as next year.

  • Meanwhile, the Ford County Commission has agreed to sponsor a $750,000 economic development block grant application by Boot Hill Biofuels, which plans to construct a 110-million gallon ethanol plant near Wright…
  • Boot Hill would be operated by Conestoga Energy Partners, the same group building ethanol plants near Garden City and Liberal. If all goes well, construction on the plant could begin next summer, with construction completed in 2008…
  • The two proposals are separate, and construction of one plant should not affect the other, according to officials from Dial Resources. Initial plans for that company's ethanol plant called for a 110 million gallon facility; the plans have expanded since, with a 200 million gallon per year plant on the drawing board, accompanied by a 30 million gallon per year biodiesel plant…
  • Dial has yet to receive the appropriate zoning and building permits, according to the Hutchinson News…
  • Meanwhile, the promise of cellulosic-based ethanol continues to gain momentum. In Massachusets, a company called Mascoma plans to build a pilot plant that would turn forestry waste, grass, wood and other biomass products into ethanol. A partner of Mascoma says a pilot plant should be finished sometime next year, with a commercial plant in place sometime in 2008…
  • Onto other news. The National Association of Wheat Growers, at this year's National Association of Farm Broadcasters annual meeting in Kansas City last week, reiterated the importance of Congress approving a disaster bill to help wheat producers...
  • "We're going to continue to push for crop loss disaster assistance for our producers," NAWG President Dale Schuler told reporters. "We are encouraged that the Senate is still considering it, though we are disappointed that it hasn't passed yet. Our goal is that we get the much-needed assistance for our farmers for the 2005 and 2006 crop years…"
  • What else did we learn at NAFB? Some snippets: expect land prices to continue to rise steadily, says Lee Vermeer with Farmers National Company of Omaha. It appeared earlier this year that land would stabilize. That changed when crop prices began soaring, Vermeer says…
  • Good news for sorghum producers, according to the National Sorghum Producers, which is working with a California company called CIBUS to develop non-GMO, herbicide tolerant sorghum hybrids. CIBUS has developed technology that will replace genes in the plant with naturally-occurring resistance. The partners hope to have technology in plant breeders hands in less than four years…
  • Finally, congratulations to the Centre FFA, which earned two big awards at the National FFA Convention in Louisville in October. The Chapter earned first place in the television category and second place in the public relations category of an advertising and public relations campaign program sponsored by Garst Seed Company.

    The competition requires applying marketing communications principles learned from Garst-provided classroom curriculum. The chapter earned $750 for the first place award and $500 for the second place award. The theme for this year's contest was, "America's Farmland. Today's Solution to Tomorrow's Energy Needs."