The Buzz

Moran meets with Japanese ambassador. Bill Spiegel

Published on: Apr 11, 2005

First District Congressman Jerry Moran, R-Kan., and the House Agriculture Committee met last week with Japanese Ambassador Ryozo Kato to discuss opening the Japanese markets to U.S. beef.

  • Moran's meeting was his second with Ambassador Kato, who did not provide a timeline for resuming imports of U.S. beef. Japan closed markets to U.S. beef in December, 2003; since then, the U.S. has lost an estimated $2 billion in sales. "My patience with the Japanese government is wearing thin," Moran says. "Japanese government officials have no scientific evidence to keep their markets closed..."
  • The Kansas Wheat Commission and Kansas State University’s Health and Nutrition Society are sponsoring the first-ever "Flour Power 5K Run/Walk" on Sunday, April 24. The event will highlight the importance of wheat foods for competitive athletes and cash prizes will be awarded for the top three finishers in each of seven age categories...
  • The race begins at 9:30 a.m. for runners, with walkers beginning at 9:40. All participants will receive an official race t-shirt. Early registration is $15 before April 15. Late entry fees of $20 will be accepted until one hour before race start time. For more information, an entry form and race map, visit the Kansas Wheat Commission Web site at www.kswheat.com...
  • On the agribusiness side, several Kansas John Deere dealers have changed ownership since the first of the year. Most recently, Concordia Tractor and Implement, Concordia and Clay Center, bought Shouse Implement of Abilene in January. A few months ago, Conrady Implement, Anthony and Wichita, bought D & D Implement, Winfield. Earlier this year, Caldwell's, Inc., Topeka, was bought Heritage Tractor, Baldwin City. Finally, Wilhoite's, Junction City, has departed the traditional agriculture business to become a consumer products store...
  • One John Deere dealer spokesman says the changes are simply a function of what's happening on the farm – fewer, but larger farms. Expanding the number of storefronts helps give dealers economies of scale and the economic ability to train technicians, improve technology and stay more competitive...
  • The Kansas Agricultural Statistics Service released its annual prospective plantings report for 2005. Kansas farmers are expected to plant 2.9 million acres of grain sorghum, down 9% from 2004; 3.4 million acres of corn, up 10%; 110,000 acres of oats, down 8% and 20,000 acres of barley, up from 15,000 acres last year...
    • The fear of Asian soybean rust apparently doesn't exist in Kansas. Soybean acreage is expected to be 2.9 million acres, up 4% from last year. Farmers planted 10.1 million acres of wheat last fall.