School Dairy Program Boasts Strong Participation

National survey data shows Fuel Up to Play 60 program is growing

Published on: Sep 19, 2012

New data released Tuesday shows Fuel Up to Play 60 is seeing significant increases in student participation, engagement, awareness and impact across the Midwest.

The program is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program created in partnership with the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture. In the Midwest, the program is administered through the Midwest Dairy Council in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma.

The 2011-2012 Fuel Up to Play 60 Utilization and Impact Survey interviewed 1,954 program advisors and school administrators, representing 1,557 schools, in Midwest Dairy's 10-state service area. In its second year of a national roll-out, the Fuel Up to Play 60 program encourages students to eat healthy, be active and make positive, healthy changes in their schools. The survey results show Midwestern schools involved in the Fuel Up to Play 60 are making substantial progress and have seen marked increases over the 2010-2011 school year on a number of fronts, including:

National survey data shows Fuel Up to Play 60 program is growing
National survey data shows Fuel Up to Play 60 program is growing

• 70% of respondents think the program is helping students make healthier food choices (up from 57% in 2011).

• 59% say it is helping increase the amount of time students are physically active at school (up from 54% in 2011).

• 65% of respondents believe Fuel Up to Play 60 positively influences their school environment (up from 58% in 2011).

"We're thrilled that the results of the 2011-12 Fuel Up to Play 60 Research and Utilization Survey are extremely positive," said Molly Pelzer, senior vice president of Midwest Dairy Council. "The results confirm Fuel Up to Play 60's status as the premier program to address child health and wellness in schools."