SARE Celebrates 25 Year Anniversary

Sustainable effort has reached many in agriculture.

Published on: Sep 24, 2013

For a quarter-century, USDA's focus on conservation farming via its Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program has been there.

With shrinking profit margins on the farm, and challenges in costs and availability of resource and other inputs to grow crops, SARE has positioned itself in the forefront of helping producers do their job more efficiently and environmentally correct.

Thousands of farmers and ranchers have felt the helpful hand of SARE as a partner in sustaining production while preserving nature. Educators and researchers also joined with SARE to develop outreach with new techniques for the grower.

Western Farmer-Stockman has reported regularly on the SARE effort, with the most recent articles appearing in the February, 2013, edition (click on Magazines  Online on this website to see that issue).

For 25 years, SARE  has helped farmers throughout the nation learn how to farm more efficiently while preserving natural resources and increasing profits.
For 25 years, SARE has helped farmers throughout the nation learn how to farm more efficiently while preserving natural resources and increasing profits.

To learn more about SARE,  download the brochure "25 Years of Sare."

It all began in 1988 with pressures mounting for USDA to make a heavy investment in the future of sustainable agriculture. Congress approved funding for SARE, establishing a competitive grant-making model that it considers to be innovative

Regionally administered SARE programs are science-based efforts driven by stakeholders including farmers and ranchers. SARE grants field test new ways to doing things on farms and Extension research stations, encouraging producers and educators to share research results with others.

SARE grantees are leading the way in advancing sustainable on the farm and ranch, officials believe, improving productivity, profits, stewardship and quality of life for growers, and society.

Among the highest focus  studies in the last 25 years, SARE researchers say they have played a key role in development of many new ideas in the following:

•Cover crops
•Rotational grazing
•Local and regional marketing
•Large-scale agroecosystem research
•Small-scale meat processing
•Energy independence
•Water conservation

For a review of current SARE projects, go to www.sare.org/projects.