Rust Found in Georgia , Mississippi Sentinel Plots

The first rust find in Mississippi in 2005 occurred from soybean samples collected on July 13th from a sentinel plot in George County. Compiled by staff

Published on: Jul 18, 2005

The first rust find in Mississippi in 2005 occurred from soybean samples collected on July 13th from a sentinel plot in George County. Another county in Georgia, Tift County, reported rust on soybean, while the Seminole County find was on volunteer soybeans which have since been destroyed.

Eight counties in Florida have now reported soybean rust on kudzu with two reports from soybean. The newest report is from soybean grown in a sentinel plot in Escambia County near to some production fields.

In Alabama, soybean rust has now been reported on soybeans from a sentinel plot and a commercial soybean field. This was the first report from a commercial soybean field in 2005.

Intensive scouting is continuing throughout eastern North America from the Gulf coast to southern Ontario wherever soybean is grown with no new finds. As new tropical storms move through infected areas, there is more possibilities of spore dispersal. The fallout from "Dennis" in terms of new infection points would be seven or more days after spore deposition

Late Monday Georgia researchers reported a rust find in a sentinel plot. Here's the report from www.sbrusa.net:

"Report from 18 July 2005 Dr. Layla Sconyers, research associate in the Department of Plant Pathology today found approximately a half-dozen pustules of soybean rust on a single leaf (from a sample of 100 collected on 15 July. The diagnosis was confirmed morphologically by diagnostician Jason Brock and Dr. Bob Kemerait based upon presence of pustules and characterisitc spores. The sample was collected at the Lang Research Farm on the Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton GA, in one of our sentinel plots. Soybean rust has not yet been found in any other sentinel plots in Georgia or in commercial fields."

Growers in the coastal plain are being advised to initiate fungicide spraying programs as their crop reaches first bloom. Growers whose soybeans are beyond that stage are being advised to make fungicide applications.

Tennessee finds spores
Another spore trap discovery identified a very small number of spores in one trap that could be Asian soybean rust. No signs of rust pustules were found in the sentinel plot where the spores were found. All Tennessee sentinel plots have tested negative for the disease.