RFA Releases E-15 Retailer Handbook

EPA approves model plan for E-15 put forth by RFA.

Published on: Mar 19, 2012

The Environmental Protection Agency sent a letter to the Renewable Fuels Association saying RFA's Misfueling Mitigation Plan for E-15 would generally be sufficient to satisfy the partial waivers' requirements for a misfueling mitigation plan. RFA President and CEO Bob Dinneen says Americans will soon have a safe and effective new fuel option at the pump that is domestically-made and significantly cheaper than gasoline.

"E-15 ethanol blends have withstood rigorous testing and mountains of challenges," Dinneen said. "And now EPA is allowing America's ethanol industry to turn its full attention to educating consumers on the benefits of higher level ethanol blends."

The next steps include ensuring companies seeking to offer E-15 are registered with EPA, have submitted the Misfueling Mitigation plan and are addressing lingering fuel regulatory requirements at the state level. RFA has released the E-15 Retailer Handbook, which provides guidance in evaluating existing infrastructure compatibility, safety and conversion practices and state specific regulatory requirements.

The 44-page handbook is meant to help ensure compliance with the EPA's misfueling mitigation requirements and make retailers aware of the labeling requirements in addition to the regulations surrounding blending, storing and dispensing E-15, according to the RFA. The RFA is also providing EPA-approved E15 labels at no charge to retailers.

Some states do still have regulatory problems that would prevent E-15, however other states, like Illinois, Iowa and Kansas, are prepared to welcome E-15 so drivers in those states will be the first to see E-15 at the pump.

Legislation in Washington and pending litigation over EPA's waiver approval are still in the wings, but RFA says it will continue to vigorously defend the Obama Administration's approval of E-15. Dinneen says it will take a constant and driven effort to educate consumers and fend off unfounded claims by anti-ethanol voices in the fuels industry and on Capitol Hill.