Program On Tree Disease And Selection March 30 In Austin

Oak wilt is one of the most destructive diseases in the nation and is killing oak trees in Central Texas at alarming rates.

Published on: Feb 21, 2013

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service office for Travis County will present a program on oak wilt and other tree diseases, as well as proper plant selection for South Central Texas, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 30.

The program will be in Room 1130 of Austin Community College, 1820 W. Stassney Lane in Austin.

"Oak wilt, one of the most destructive tree diseases in the United States, is killing oak trees in Central Texas at epidemic proportions," says Dr. David Appel, Texas AgriLife Extension Service program leader for plant pathology, College Station. "Plus drought and other types of environmental stress can injure and possibly kill trees, as well as make them more vulnerable to insect and disease pests."

KNOW OAK WILT. Identification and prevention of oak wilt disease will be among the topics discussed an AgriLife Extension program March 30 in Austin.
KNOW OAK WILT. Identification and prevention of oak wilt disease will be among the topics discussed an AgriLife Extension program March 30 in Austin.

Appel will be featured speaker at the program, which also will include Daphne Richards, AgriLife Extension horticulturist for Travis County.

"This is a great opportunity for people to get information about which trees are affected by oak wilt, find out how to identify the disease, learn how it is spread, and understand how it can be managed," Richards says. "Dr. Appel has taught graduate and undergraduate courses on introductory plant pathology, plant disease diagnosis, forest protection, and environmental regulations. He is a recognized statewide expert on oak wilt, so this is a unique opportunity to learn from him."

Richards says the program will address oak wilt in depth, as well as drought-related plant diseases and proper selection and planting for the region.

"Certain tree species are better adapted for the climate and soil conditions in Central Texas and how a tree is planted can contribute to its health and longevity," Richards says.

Cost for the program is $25 and one Texas Department of Agriculture continuing education unit in pesticides for the general category will be offered to participants.

There is ample free parking, but you need to know your vehicle license when you sign in on the clipboard for the program. Contact Rosalie Russell at 512-804-2257 for questions about the program.

For registration questions, call 979-845-2604 or go online to agriliferegister@tamu.edu. Enter the keyword "trees" and "Austin" for the location.