Pork Groups Team Up with Illinois Corn Growers on DDGS Research

National Pork Checkoff Board, IPPA and ICGA join forces on feed research to improve nutrient utilization of swine.

Published on: Jan 8, 2008

The National Pork Checkoff Board, the Illinois Pork Producers, and the Illinois Corn Marketing Board Association are partnering together in new research to improve nutrient utilization of dried distillers grains in swine rations.

The partnership was developed from the common interest these organizations share in swine industry research related to DDGS and other biofuel co-products.

The IPPA was instrumental in developing this relationship and are members of the Checkoff Consortium and a partner in the Illinois Corn Marketing Board research efforts. The Checkoff Consortium sets research priorities and recommends funding for research projects that study ways to reduce feed costs and maximize production efficiencies.

At present, the Checkoff Consortium and the ICMB are in the process of reviewing research proposals for 2008. Funding decisions will be made in early March.

"It’s exciting to have Illinois corn growers, through their checkoff support, collaborate with us on this important program," said Mark Boggess, director of animal sciences for the Pork Checkoff. "In the long run, we our organizations have similar goals and we are both much better off by teaming up".

The 2008 Pork Checkoff programming budget for nutritional efficiency efforts is $500,000. The ICMB has dedicated up to $500,000 of its 2008 budget to similar research to further develop and improve DDGS for the pork and livestock industry.

"This is an opportunity for industry stakeholders to leverage combined funding for the good of everyone involved," says Brian Sturtevant, pork producer from Lanark, Ill. and current IPPA president.

"Consortium members have devoted a lot of time and effort to making sure the groups' research priorities are relevant to the industry and that research project outcomes are applicable and not duplicative of someone else's efforts," Boggess says. "The bottom line is that corn growers will benefit by understanding how they can make their product and byproducts better for pork producers; and pork producers benefit by understanding how they can use co-products more efficiently."