Numbers Reveal Just How Bad Fruit Production Was In 2012

Cherries, apples and peaches decimated by series of frosts after unusually warm spring.

Published on: Feb 12, 2013

Michigan fruit crops were devastated by an unusually warm March followed by a series of frosts in April. This caused abnormally low fruit production, according to Jay Johnson, Director, USDA, NASS, Michigan  Field Office.

Michigan apple production was 115 million pounds, down from 980 million pounds in 2011. The preliminary farm level value of production was $40.5 million.

Michigan tart cherry production was 11.6 million pounds, compared with 157.5 million pounds in 2011. The average yield was 425 pounds per acre. The preliminary farm level value was $12.9 million.

Sweet cherry production was 4,250 tons, down from 18,600 tons produced in 2011.The average yield was 0.65 tons per acre. The preliminary farm level value was $6.1 million.

Numbers Reveal Just How Bad Fruit Production Was In 2012
Numbers Reveal Just How Bad Fruit Production Was In 2012

Cultivated blueberry production in Michigan was 87 million pounds, approximately 18% of the U.S. total. Michigan growers harvested 19,700 acres in 2012. The farm level value was $122.7 million.

Strawberry production in Michigan was 3.3 million pounds on 650 harvested acres. The farm level value was $4.8 million.

Michigan grape production was 38,200 tons. The farm level value was $17.9 million. There were 21,000 tons of Concords and 10,800 tons of Niagara grapes processed.

Michigan peach production was 4 million pounds, down from 33.3 million pounds in 2011. Bearing acres were 3,600, and the farm level value was $2.6 million.

Pear production in Michigan was 40 tons on 700 acres. The farm level value was $25,000. Michigan plum production was 65 tons on 500 acres. The farm level value was $38,000.