New Technology for Disease Control

DuPont expects EPA registration soon of fungicide for corn, soybeans and cereal crops.

Published on: Mar 2, 2012

DuPont will soon roll out its first entry in corn, soybean and wheat disease management in a long time. Farmers attending Commodity Classic in Nashville, Tenn., had the opportunity to learn about a new fungicide called Approach.

"This is exciting new chemistry and it will do everything existing fungicides will do plus bring more consistency in managing yield," says Wayne Schumacher, DuPont Crop Protection new technology manager. Approach features preventive, residual and curative properties as well as unique movement within the plant and crop canopy.

"No matter the droplet size, Approach travels from the top to the bottom of the leaf and spreads out to the edges within 24 hours," explains Schumacher. "The chemical can also move down through the canopy so the coverage is top to bottom. Even new leaves will be protected."

In corn, Approach provides broad-spectrum disease control in corn for Gray leaf spot, Northern corn leaf blight, Southern corn leaf blight and common rust.

Field trials are in the 6th year and Schumacher says the studies show, with proper disease management, average yield increases of 6 to 7 bushels per acre in corn and 2 to 3 bushels per acre in soybeans. 'We will work closely with growers to make sure they have the proper varieties and proper fertility. Timing is important, too."

The product promises broad spectrum control in soybeans. "It is the first product to control white mold, says Schumacher. In addition, it provides broad-spectrum control of Brown spot, Frogeye leafspot and Asian soybean rust.

In cereal grains, Approach provides broad-spectrum control of Septoria leaf and glume botch, rusts, tan spot, powdery mildew, spot blotch and black point.

DuPont expects EPA registration sometime in April and Schumacher says when approval is received, they will focus on corn and soybean growing areas for 2012. "We will probably be too late for wheat."

Supplies of Approach should be available for growers who want it, notes Schumacher.