NCSU's College Of Agriculture Hones Vision For The Future

New Dean Richard Linton holds listening sessions around the state to chart CALS future.

Published on: Jan 22, 2013

The N.C. State University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is an important linchpin for N.C. farmers of all descriptions. Among other things, the university conducts a wide range of agricultural research and education, and virtually all the state's farmers know about and benefit from the university at one level or another.

But while the agricultural community knows well what CALS has done for farming in the past, it can be less certain what the institution will be doing for the industry in 10, 25 or 50 years in the future. That is a question not only asked by those on the outside looking in at the college, but in some ways, something still to be decided by the people who are directly connected with the college itself. To get a clearer idea of that direction, CALS' top leadership is currently undertaking a series of listening sessions with faculty and students as well as other stakeholders.

TAKING IT IN: The new dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Richard Linton (standing, in red tie) listens as a NC State University staff discussion group leader outlines her groups thoughts on the direction for the future of CALS.
TAKING IT IN: The new dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Richard Linton (standing, in red tie) listens as a NC State University staff discussion group leader outlines her group's thoughts on the direction for the future of CALS.

CALS has a new dean this year, Dean Richard Linton, so the listening sessions are an opportunity for faculty and staff, as well as the public, to get to know him better and for him to hear their suggestions as well.

To stir the thinking process, CALS has been circulating a survey among those planning to attend the sessions with questions that ask the various stakeholders to describe what they envision as the institution's future. It also asks what they envision CALS could be able to do in the future to support their individual career goals.

The listening sessions began January 7 at the McKimmon Center on the N.C. State University Campus and will continue through Feb 8. Following is a list of the remaining ongoing meetings that are scheduled:

• January 24: Duplin County Extension Center, 165 Agriculture Drive, Kenansville, 8-10 a.m. invitation and registration.

• January 24: Vernon G. James Research and Extension Center, 207 Research Station Road, Plymouth, 4-6 p.m.  invitation and registration.

• February 6: Union County Extension Center, 3230-D Presson Road, Monroe, 8-10 a.m. invitation and registration.

• February 7: Iredell County Extension Center, 444 Bristol Drive, Statesville, 4-6 p.m. invitation and registration.

• February 8: Western North Carolina Ag Center, Virginia Boone Center, 1301 Fanning Bridge Road, Fletcher, 8-10 a.m. invitation and registration.

• February 8: Madison County Extension Center, 258 Carolina Lane, Marshall, 4-6 p.m. invitation and registration.

To learn more about the listening sessions, contact Jennifer Bernabi at jennifer_bernabi@ncsu.edu or 919-515-6212.