National Farm-City Week Kicks Off Today

National event highlights rural-urban partnership that feeds, clothes America.

Published on: Nov 19, 2012

Nearly 1 in 20 workers in our national economy plays a role in getting food and fiber from the farm to consumers? And this week, National Farm-City Week, is set aside to celebrate the connection between rural and urban areas.

Farm-City Week celebrates the partnership between farmers and their urban colleagues who help prepare, transport, market and retail the food and fiber farmers grow for America's consumers. This year marks the 57th anniversary of the annual celebration. Kiwanis International began National Farm-City Week in 1955 to increase the understanding of the partnership between urban and rural residents. Farm days at schools, farm tours, banquets and mayoral proclamations are just a few of the activities that will be held in communities across the country to mark this annual event.

PHOTO CUTLINE: GFB President Zippy Duvall, seated, signs a proclamation declaring Nov. 16-22 Farm-City Week. Pictured from left, GFB Middle Georgia Vice President Robert Fountain, GFB North Georgia Vice President Bernard Sims and GFB 1st Vice President Gerald Long join Duvall for the signing.
PHOTO CUTLINE: GFB President Zippy Duvall, seated, signs a proclamation declaring Nov. 16-22 Farm-City Week. Pictured from left, GFB Middle Georgia Vice President Robert Fountain, GFB North Georgia Vice President Bernard Sims and GFB 1st Vice President Gerald Long join Duvall for the signing.

County Farm Bureaus across Georgia are celebrating Farm-City Week with events designed to increase awareness of agriculture in their communities. Counties have been holding events throughout November as schedules allowed.

"Farm-City Week is a great chance for farmers to tell consumers how we grow the food, fiber and lumber that feeds, clothes and houses America. Our country has an incredible food and fiber supply system that gets the commodities we grow from the farm to consumers," GFB President Zippy Duvall said. "It takes the work of commodity brokers, food processors, food inspectors, cotton ginners, clothing manufacturers, truck drivers, retail clerks and many more to get our food and clothes to consumers. This partnership is what we're celebrating this week."