Montana Farm Service Reminds Of Nov. 15 Acre Report Deadline

Other 2014 acreage deadlines also pending.

Published on: Oct 29, 2013

Bruce Nelson, Montana Farm Service Agency state executive director, reminds producers that new deadlines for submitting their annual  report of acreage to local USDA offices are near.

Producers with apiculture, perennial forage, and Pasture, Rangeland and Forage – including Nevada grass, fall wheat (hard red winter wheat) and all other fall-seeded small grains must submit a 2014 acreage report of those crops by Nov. 15.

This is also the date for these crops to be reported to crop insurance agents when carrying federal crop insurance.

Other 2014 acreage reporting deadlines include the following:

  • Jan. 2, 2014 (or 30 days after colony placement): Honey covered under Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program.
  • Jan 15, 2014: Cherries, established stand alfalfa seed, and fall alfalfa seed.
  • July 15, 2014: Spring alfalfa seed, barley, canola, corn, dry beans, dry peas, flax, forage seeding, mustard, spring oat, potatoes, safflower, sugarbeets, sunflowers, spring wheat, Conservation Reserve Program and all other crops.

"Prior to crop year 2013, reports for these crops were not due to FSA until July," notes Nelson. "This change is part of an initiative at the national level to align acreage reporting dates between FSA and the Risk Management Agency, and will eventually reduce the crop reporting burden on producers."

Growers are urged to continue to report their acreages to the FSA and RMA despite concerns about the future of federal farm programs.
Growers are urged to continue to report their acreages to the FSA and RMA despite concerns about the future of federal farm programs.

At this time, he adds, producers are required to file an acreage report to both agencies.

"At some time in the future, producers will only be required to file one acreage report that will be utilized by both agencies."

The expiration of the current Farm Bill in September and the lack of a replacement is creating some concern about the future of programs from USDA, but Nelson says he highly encourages producers to continue to report their acreages for a farm, including crops and non-cropland such as hayed or grazed grassland.