MachineryLink Launches Philanthropic Effort

Combine rental program now offering CommunityLink, which donates $1,500 to ag organization of new customer's choice.

Published on: Jun 25, 2013

MachineryLink, a program that allows farmers to rent a combine for the period of time they need to use it, is offering a way to give back to farm communities, and – promoters hope – draw more users into its program.

The company has launched a philanthropic initiative that it calls "CommunmityLink."

CommunityLink contributes $1,500 to the philanthropic organization of choice for any new customer or $1,500 to any organization that directs a new customer to MachineryLink.

MachineryLink spokesman Justin Miller says the company has been working with 4-H and FFA organizations, letting them know about the opportunity to raise some money for their group and at the same time, help an area family find a better solution to their combine needs than the purchase of a machine.

"We had a lot of people who really werent sure they were going to have a crop to harvest until pretty late in the season," said MachineryLink spokesman Justin Miller. "They have been holding off until they were sure the crop would make."
"We had a lot of people who really weren't sure they were going to have a crop to harvest until pretty late in the season," said MachineryLink spokesman Justin Miller. "They have been holding off until they were sure the crop would make."

Program is growing

Miller says MachineryLink continues to grow and the philanthropic effort is designed to give back to the customers who make it a success.

With wheat harvest starting in Kansas this week, Miller said the last-minute customers are starting to call.

"We had a lot of people who really weren't sure they were going to have a crop to harvest until pretty late in the season," he said. "They have been holding off until they were sure the crop would make."

An unseasonably cool and wet May helped wheat, particularly in the central corridor of the state where a freeze as late as May 3 caused some damage. Early reports on harvest indicate average yields across much of south central Kansas can be expected.

In the western part of the state, wheat was hit first with drought and then with repeated freezes and abandonment has been high.

"West of Highway 83, we're talking pretty much total devastation," Miller said. "From Goodland down to Garden City and west into eastern Colorado, there just isn't anything green. The drought has been awful and they haven't gotten the recent rains that much of the state has seen."