Livestock And Pasture School Accepting Students

The East Texas Livestock and Pasture Management School is a three-day program designed to attract national and international students.

Published on: Feb 15, 2013

Even though parts of Texas have had relief from the drought, grain and fertilizer prices remain high, which makes efficient pasture management as critical as ever to livestock producers, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist.

Slated for March 26-28 at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Overton, the three-day Pasture and Livestock Management workshop now is accepting students.

"Though billed as being for novice ranchers, the school teaches both beginners and the experienced to get the most 'bang for their buck'," says Dr. Gerald Smith, Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant breeder, Overton, and one of the school instructors.

DOG IT UP. Working cow dogs will be one of the more entertaining presentations at the upcoming livestock and pasture management school at Overton, Texas. Texas A&M AgriLife Communications photo by Robert Burns
DOG IT UP. Working cow dogs will be one of the more entertaining presentations at the upcoming livestock and pasture management school at Overton, Texas. Texas A&M AgriLife Communications photo by Robert Burns

"Actually, high feed grain prices means efficient forage production is more important than ever," Smith adds. "It's simple. More forage for less money means more profit."

And while costs everywhere else are going up, Overton center faculty have worked to keep the cost of the school level, Dr. Monte Rouquette, AgriLife Research forage scientist, and another program instructor.

Registration for the three-day school is $350, which includes meals, including all lunches, barbecue, a steak dinner, continental style breakfasts, and all educational materials.

Registration is limited to 60 students to allow plenty of one-on-one time between the instructors and students, Rouquette says. Participants may reserve an opening by phone or email by contacting Jennifer Lloyd at 903-834-6191 or by Email to jllloyd@ag.tamu.edu.

Lloyd will have information on class openings, local accommodations, and also driving directions to the Overton center.

"We've heard again and again from students that what they've learned in the first morning paid for the cost of the course many times over," says Dr. Greg Clary, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service economist and another course instructor.

Most of the instructors hold doctorates in their fields and are either with AgriLife Extension or AgriLife Research, Rouquette says. They have expertise in forage breeding and production, soil fertility, wildlife management, beef cattle nutrition, and marketing.