Kentucky Receives Waiver To Mix Aflatoxin-Contaminated Corn

This year's poor growing season has contributed to high aflatoxin in Kentucky.

Published on: Oct 24, 2012

By Laura Skillman

The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture's Division of Regulatory Services in conjunction with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture has received approval for Kentucky corn high in aflatoxin to be mixed with other corn to obtain an aflatoxin content safe for feeding to specific animals.

Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin produced primarily by the fungus or mold, Aspergillus flavus. Under normal conditions, the blending of aflatoxin-contaminated corn is prohibited. The request was sent Oct. 12 to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and it has been granted under specific conditions, said Darrell Johnson, UK Division of Regulatory Services director. This waiver is only for Kentucky corn.

Kentucky Receives Waiver To Mix Aflatoxin-Contaminated Corn
Kentucky Receives Waiver To Mix Aflatoxin-Contaminated Corn

This year's poor growing season has contributed to high aflatoxin levels in some cornfields and has prompted several states to request waivers from the FDA.

The waiver establishes procedures for mixing. Prior to any mixing, producers must sign an agreement with UK's Division of Regulatory Services. Corn with levels above 500 parts per billion cannot be blended.

The blended corn cannot be sold for human consumption. It is allowed for use in feeds for mature poultry, breeding swine and finishing swine more than 100 pounds, breeding beef cattle and finishing beef cattle. It cannot be used in feed for dairy animals or young livestock, and it must carry a precautionary statement that lists acceptable uses.

After being blended and prior to shipment, the corn must be tested and certified that the aflatoxin content does not exceed the levels approved for its intended use. For specific details and to request a waiver, please visit the UK Division of Regulatory Services website at http://www.rs.uky.edu or call 859-257-2785.

Monitoring aflatoxin levels in Kentucky corn will continue, and that information will be used to determine the ongoing need and enforcement of the waiver.