Kansas Communities Soon to Lose USDA Rural Housing Eligibility

USDA Rural Development Housing Loans and direct loans won't be available in six communities.

Published on: Sep 3, 2013

Six Kansas communities will become ineligible for USDA Rural Development Housing programs on Oct. 1 if the 2010 census data is implemented.

Andover, Gardner, Hays, Junction City, Liberal and Pittsburg, including Frontenac, will no longer be eligible for USDA Guaranteed Rural Housing loans and direct loans because of increases in population.

In addition to the new six ineligible communities, the current Wichita ineligible area will be expanded east to join the Andover ineligible area. An initial listing of communities losing eligibility included Ottawa, but that information was incorrect, according to USDA. Ottawa will remain an eligible area.

For information regarding USDA Rural Development Housing programs, contact the Agency at 785-271-2720, or visit the Agency's Kansas website.

Six Kansas communities, Andover, Gardner, Hays, Junction City, Liberal and Pittsburg, including Frontenac, will no longer be eligible for USDA Guaranteed Rural Housing loans and direct loans due to increase in population if 2010 census data is implemented.
Six Kansas communities, Andover, Gardner, Hays, Junction City, Liberal and Pittsburg, including Frontenac, will no longer be eligible for USDA Guaranteed Rural Housing loans and direct loans due to increase in population if 2010 census data is implemented.

USDA, through its Rural Development mission area, has a portfolio of programs designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural America.

USDA has made a concerted effort to continue to make those programs available even as the department implements sequestration – the across-the-board budget reductions mandated under terms of the Budget Control Act.

USDA has already undertaken historic efforts since 2009 to save more than $828 million in taxpayer funds through targeted, common-sense budget reductions. These reductions have put USDA in a better position to carry out its mission, while implementing sequester budget reductions in a fair manner that causes as little disruption as possible.