Group Changes Membership Rules, Opens to New Fuel Tech

The National Biodiesel Board will open its membership for 'qualified renewable diesel producers.'

Published on: Jun 13, 2013

Just when is a biodiesel a biodiesel? That's long been a question as more ways to make renewable diesel become available. But you couldn't be a member of the National Biodiesel Board if you didn't make your diesel from vegetable oil. Not anymore, NBB announced today it was opening its membership to makers of renewable diesel products as well. And the result will create "a stronger and more effective voice for both," according to the press announcement.

In the press statement, Joe Jobe, CEO of NBB, says: "While produced with different technologies, biodiesel and renewable diesel are close cousins with a lot of shared interests, particularly in policy are such as the [Renewable Fuel Standard] and the blender's tax incentive. Joining forces puts us in a much stronger position as a coalition to make our voice heard and spread the word that these policies are working and that advanced biofuels are here today."

OPENING DOORS: Now makers of more than biodiesel can join the National Biodiesel Board.
OPENING DOORS: Now makers of more than biodiesel can join the National Biodiesel Board.

With the change, NBB will represent the biomass-based diesel category under the RFS, which Job says offers an important diversification of the transportation fuels marketplace.

The news was welcomed by those who produced renewable diesel products. Biodiesel and renewable diesel are both made with renewable  resources such as soybean oil, animal fats and recycled cooking oils. Biodiesel is produced by a natural chemical reaction that takes place when alcohol is introduced to oils or facts in the presence of a catalyst.

Renewable diesel is made when hydrogen is added to the oils or fats under high pressure and temperatures, converting it into a hydrocarbon very similar to diesel fuel refined from petroleum crude.

Both types of fuel reduce greenhouse gas emissions, displace imported petroleum diesel, create jobs and economic activity and are compatible with existing diesel engines and fuel distribution infrastructure. Learn more about the organization by visiting www.nbb.org.