Grants Will Help Feed Hungry

Funding will support local efforts to fight hunger and food insecurity.

Published on: Feb 16, 2012

The USDA has released 27 grants to local organizations to build community food systems and fight hunger and food insecurity. The new projects, totaling $4.8 million in funding, include a teen-run community kitchen incubator, faith-based community food assessments, a program to help indigenous people return to healthful eating, and a youth-led food security movement. The awards were made by USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture through its Community Food Projects program.

The primary goals of the Community Food Projects program are to (1) meet the food needs of low-income individuals; (2) increase the food self-reliance of low-income communities; (3) promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm and nutrition issues; and (4) meet specific state, local or neighborhood food and agricultural needs.

"Hunger remains an important issue in the United States. Last year, 17.2 million households faced food insecurity - meaning they lacked consistent access to adequate food," said Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services Kevin Concannon. "The grants supported by the Community Food Projects empower local organizations to respond to food and nutrition needs in their own communities."

USDA's Household Food Security in the United States, 2010 report found that the percentage of very low food security declined from 5.7 percent of households in 2009 to 5.4 percent in 2010. The USDA study indicates that in 2010, 17.2 million households in America had difficulty providing enough food due to a lack of resources. The number of food insecure households in 2010 was relatively consistent with statistics released in 2008 and 2009.

The report also indicates that 59 percent of all food-insecure households participated in one or more of the three largest nutrition assistance programs near the time of the survey. In fiscal year 2010, these programs provided much needed food assistance to millions of individuals, children and families in need:

In an average month of fiscal year 2011, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provided benefits to 44.7 million people in the United States.

In fiscal year 2011, the National School Lunch Program provided meals to an average of 31.8 million children each school day.

In fiscal year 2011, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children served an average 9 million participants.