Fish & Wildlife Service Sets Denver Hearings On Wolf Proposals

Session set for Oct. 17.

Published on: Oct 9, 2013

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wolf proposals will be aired at a Denver hearing Oct. 28 to field comments on a plan to remove the gray wolf from the Endangered and Threatened Wildlife list and Maintaining Protections for the Mexican wolf by listing it as endangered; to receive input on a revision to the Nonessential Experimental Population of the Mexican wolf.

The session, set for Oct. 17 from 6 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at the Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place in Denver, will receive  public comments, with an Oct. 28 deadline set for written comments.

For more information and for links to learn more, including how to comment on the gray wolf delisting proposal, go to www.fws.gov/graywolfrecorvery062013.html. To learn more, including how to comment on the Mexican wolf proposal, go to http://www.fws/gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/ and click on the line"2013 Proposed Revision to the Nonessential Experimental Population of the Mexican Wolf."

Fish & Wildlife Service Sets Denver Hearings On Wolf Proposals
Fish & Wildlife Service Sets Denver Hearings On Wolf Proposals

While the gray wolf was once a dominant species in the U.S., its demise – along with that of the grizzly bear – came as a result of incessant attacks by the predators which caused citizens of the earlier pioneer generation to decimate populations.

Nearly extinct some years ago, the gray wolf was reintroduced and protected despite complaints from western livestock producers that the decision would have a profound impact on their animal losses, a situation which has developed over the past several years. Despite improved relationships in how ranchers and the government can work together to control depredation, many in the industry feel the number of wolf kills has continued to mount.

Protected by the Endangered Species Act, the wolf has become a prime concern for ranchers, while triggering widespread support from environmental groups claiming the gray plans a role in ecological balance, helping to keep burgeoning wildlife population in check.

Environmental interests such as Idaho-headquartered Advocates of the West argue that removal of the wolf protection will undo gains made in population establishment.