Fast Loading Grain Facility

Quick turnaround at new grain unloading facility in west central Missouri.

Published on: Sep 4, 2013

Ray-Carroll County Grain Growers Inc. is expanding its operation to enable farmers greater access to both domestic and international markets.

Ray-Carroll County Grain Growers is a local cooperative founded in 1931. The cooperative has expanded rapidly over the previous 20 years. It has concentrated on building new facilities to improve service to owner/customers and improve the efficiency of the cooperative, says Mike Nordwald, cooperative general manager.

This year, the cooperative embarked on monumental task of increasing grain handling capacity and efficiency. It erected a state-of-the-art grain loading system located just east of Corder and Higginsville in west central Missouri.

FAST AND FURIOUS: Mike Nordwald, Josh Riley and Tim Phillips all worked to make the new grain loading facility a reality for farmer-members of Ray-Carroll County Grain Growers. The facility brags an impressive 80,000-bushel per hour load out speed.
FAST AND FURIOUS: Mike Nordwald, Josh Riley and Tim Phillips all worked to make the new grain loading facility a reality for farmer-members of Ray-Carroll County Grain Growers. The facility brags an impressive 80,000-bushel per hour load out speed.

Increased efficiency

The new grain loading system will serve both trucks and trains. U.S. Highway 20 will allow for truck traffic, while the Kansas City Southern Railway Company will serve rail cars. The KCS is one of five Class 1 railroads in the U.S. This rail access will allow Ray-Carroll County Grain Growers to ship to various feed markets, gulf exports, processors, and exports into Mexico with train sizes up to 125 cars, Nordwald says.

Not only will the new facility open markets, but also expedite time getting to these markets. "The facility is certainly built for speed with separate scales for inbound and outbound traffic," Nordwald says. The facility boasts a 60,000-bushel per hour unload speed and an 80,000-bushel per hour load out speed.

The inbound scale and grain grading will be attended with the office staff that has the technology to communicate directly with the driver, while the outbound scale will be unattended. Rather, it will be equipped with an automated scale ticket printer.

"With the dual scales and fast unloading customers should expect to be exiting the facility within about six minutes of weighing in," Nordwald adds. "This allows the farmer to return to the combine or grain bin quicker and better utilize their trucks and labor."

The concrete facility will be ready for this coming harvest. Nordwald says the facility would not be possible without the dedication of the 120 employees, as well as the support of cooperative members.

Source: Ray-Carroll County Grain Growers