Farm Technology For The Family

Conference gives farm families insight on latest technology.

Published on: Dec 30, 2013

Computers on the Farm Conference covers more than computers, says program organizer John Travlos, director of University of Missouri AgEBB.

Farmers, and especially their children, also learn about their smartphones, tablets, digital cameras and new apps for agriculture.

The conference, Jan. 10-11, is at Tan-Tar-A Resort, Osage Beach.

Meetings help familiarize people with technology

The technical meetings prove popular with young people, Travlos says. "The kids help parents use new technology. It is a family affair. We give a special welcome to FFA and 4-H members."

The conference is for all people interested in computer applications on the farm, he adds.

GETTING CONNECTED: Young people on the farm are often giving tutorials to their parents. The Computers on the Farm Conference offers a way for both parents and children to learn about the latest technology available.
GETTING CONNECTED: Young people on the farm are often giving tutorials to their parents. The Computers on the Farm Conference offers a way for both parents and children to learn about the latest technology available.

"We have experts telling about computing advances. However, farm users teach as well, sharing ideas and software they developed," says Travlos, who manages the MU Agricultural Electronic Bulletin Board. AgEBB is part of the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

Classes feature lots of hands-on training. Participants are encouraged to bring their own equipment.

Exhibits offer more information and potential for hands-on use of technology.

Technology provides practical applications to agriculture

Some of the software and apps developed by MU specialists include weather tools by Ray Massey, Columbia, "precision agriculture" by Kent Shannon, agricultural engineer, Centralia, and crop nutrient management tools by John Lory, soil scientist, Columbia.

Brad Scharf, MU animal scientist, will return with an update on "Heat Stress in Livestock." The apps are available for Android and iPhones.

Travlos adds there will be new information on unmanned aerial vehicles. "We try to keep up with the rapid changes going on in agriculture."

Also added are computer security, update on farm taxes and cloud computing.

Register online here.

Source: University of Missouri Extension