Farm Progress Show Highlights

New technology and machinery draws large crowds to Farm Progress Show.

Published on: Sep 18, 2013

It was a good year to take a leisurely walk through exhibits at the 2013 Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Ill. While temperatures hovered in the upper 90s, farmers strolled from booth to booth looking at the latest in agriculture technology and farming practices.

Some companies brought equipment that represent where farming practices are headed.

Calmer Corn Heads highlighted its 30 row, 12-inch corn head, haling it the "World's Largest," and "World's First" corn head of this size. While the scale alone is impressive, the company's display was just as moving. It took farmers on a visual trip starting back when farmers planted in 45-inch rows. Corn stalks were set at a distance of 45-inches.Visitors could see corn stalks set at 30-inch, then 15-inch and finally the future at 12-inch rows. The display gave farmers a visual picture of how farming practices have changed over the years.

At the 2013 Farm Progress Show, Calmer Corn Heads highlighted its 30 row, 12-inch corn head, haling it the "Worlds Largest," and "Worlds First" corn head of this size.
At the 2013 Farm Progress Show, Calmer Corn Heads highlighted its 30 row, 12-inch corn head, haling it the "World's Largest," and "World's First" corn head of this size.

Other companies erected displays that made farmers feel like they were attending more of a tech show in the city rather than a farm show in the country.

The interactive displays grabbed the attention of farmer and kids alike. Winfield used blocks and tabletops to show just how their products worked from crop planning through harvest. Individuals placed the block embedded with sensor technology on the interactive computer table and up popped information. Then users could slide the block along the table to reveal more information.

Interactive displays at the Farm Progress Show, like this one at Winfields tent, grabbed the attention of farmer and kids alike. Winfield used blocks and tabletops to show just how their products worked from crop planning through harvest.
Interactive displays at the Farm Progress Show, like this one at Winfield's tent, grabbed the attention of farmer and kids alike. Winfield used blocks and tabletops to show just how their products worked from crop planning through harvest.

Similar to Ducks at Branson, only for manure pits

And if farmers wanted to see a combination of cutting edge technology and machinery, they headed over to Nuhn Industries to see the latest advancement in the manure industry, the Nuhn Header Series Lagoon Crawler. Many passersby wandered into the display just to ask, "What is it?"

Designer Ian Nuhn, who is owns the company with his father, was happy to share the story of the new amphibious manure pump. "We have had such a great response at the show," he said.

Many passersby at the Farm Progress Show stopped by the Nuhn Industries lot to see the Nuhn Header Series Lagoon Crawler to ask, "What is it?" Designer Ian Nuhn was happy to share the story of the amphibious manure pump, which is operated via remote control device.
Many passersby at the Farm Progress Show stopped by the Nuhn Industries lot to see the Nuhn Header Series Lagoon Crawler to ask, "What is it?" Designer Ian Nuhn was happy to share the story of the amphibious manure pump, which is operated via remote control device.

For those in Missouri, the machine operates similar to that of the Ducks at Branson, except without an individual onboard maneuvering the machine. Farmers can drive the manure pump into the lagoon via a hand-held remote control device. Once in the manure, a touch of the button folds the wheels upward allowing the agitator to float. It is powered by a header pump, which by switching from the front, back or side agitation nozzles, the operator can control direction.

While the company was unable to demonstrate on site, they have provided a video made after the Lagoon Crawler's introduction at the Farm Progress Show. Watch the video below to see the latest from Nuhn Industries in action.

For more stories from the Farm Progress Show check out my blog. Then feel free to look around the Farm Progress site for additional photos and commentary on this year's show.