Fall Likely To Be Cooler, Wetter

First freeze will likely be only 1-2 weeks later than normal, predicts World Weather president.

Published on: Jul 29, 2013

Fall weather in North Dakota and South Dakota will likely be cooler and wetter than normal, says Drew Lerner, president, World Weather, Inc.

He spoke at a recent Asgrow-DeKalb field day in Horace, N.D.

"There is a lot of cool air around in the northern hemisphere," he says.

It may not freeze sooner than normal, he says, but the first freeze will likely only be 1-2 weeks later than normal.

"We are not looking for a warm, dry fall," he says.

Exactly when the weather turns cool and wet is a question. Lerner says there's a good chance that the will be a short spell of warmer dry weather in late August that may help row crops mature. Cooler than normal weather will move in sometime in September in the Dakotas and in October further south and east.

Drew Lerner tells farmers at Asgrow-DeKalb field day in North Dakota to plan for a cooler, wetter fall than they seen the last couple years.
Drew Lerner tells farmers at Asgrow-DeKalb field day in North Dakota to plan for a cooler, wetter fall than they seen the last couple years.

He predicts that the jet stream will move relatively straight across North America from west to east through the fall, which would bring a series of storm along its boundaries. He doesn't see a large ridge of high pressure building in the fall across above the Great Plains.

World Weather, Inc. is an international weather forecasting firm located in the Kansas City area. Lerner began his career in 1978 when he became involved in the International Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation. It was an international effort to improve monsoonal weather forecasting abilities from India into Southeast Asia. After that experience he joined Commodity News Services as a weather reporter and from there he obtained his experience through his involvement with Knight-Ridder Financial and Bridge Information Systems. He led the Global Weather Services group at Knight-Ridder and Bridge Information Systems from 1995 to 2001, at which time he broke away and formed his own company.

For more information, see www.worldweather.cc