Extend Grazing With The Right Blend of Forages

Forages and controlled grazing work together to offer good nutrition throughout the year.

Published on: Sep 12, 2012

Livestock producers can extend the grazing season with planning and careful management by using a mix of cool and warm season grasses along with controlled grazing. With this article we're focusing on cattle but since sheep and horses will graze pastures "down to the dirt," destroying the growth point of the plants in the process, controlled grazing can be important for them as well. The basic principles can be applied to all.

Virginia Tech associate professor and forage and livestock specialist Chris Teutsch who works at the Southern Piedmont Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Blackstone, Va., notes extended grazing can be a big money saver for beef producers.

THERE ARE LIMITS: Cattlemen can allow animals to forage when and where the cattle choose, or they can fence off the pasture off into multiple paddocks and limit the time the cattle graze each one. Moving the cattle from paddock to paddock is more efficient and gives the growing grass an opportunity to recharge.
THERE ARE LIMITS: Cattlemen can allow animals to forage when and where the cattle choose, or they can fence off the pasture off into multiple paddocks and limit the time the cattle graze each one. Moving the cattle from paddock to paddock is more efficient and gives the growing grass an opportunity to recharge.

"One of the biggest components of beef cow/calf budgets is feed," Teutsch says. "Anytime we can reduce the amount of concentrate feed in the diet of beef cattle, or reduce the amount of hay, which is very expensive to make, we are going to save money. The best way to do that is by extending grazing."

Generally, the basic idea is to look for the right mix of forages for you area. A blend of cool and warm season grasses, usually in different paddocks, and a practice of limiting the grazing time on the pasture so the grass can refresh itself is key.

We commonly think about extending grazing during the winter months," Teutsch says, "but it can be useful in the summer, as well, to fill in that summer slump ranchers commonly get in cool-season grasses.

"Then we can stockpile some of our cool-season grasses like tall fescue to provide winter grazing," he adds. "There are other alternatives for extending winter grazing, too. If you are in a crop area you can graze crop residues like corn stalks for a very minimal cost."

For cool-season grasses Teutsch looks for species that have optimal growth at cooler temperatures (around 70 degrees Fahrenheit), are more digestible and have a longer growing season. For warm season grasses, he looks for optimal growth at higher temperatures (around 90 degrees Fahrenheit), these species tend to be less digestible, but are more drought tolerant and efficient at using water.