Ethanol Use Encouraged in State of the Union Address

President Bush says four years is enough debate on an energy bill. Jacqui Fatka

Published on: Feb 3, 2005

In President George W. Bush's fifth State of the Union address, he continued his call for more reliable supplies of affordable, environmentally responsible energy including the agriculture-favorite ethanol.

"Nearly four years ago I submitted a comprehensive energy strategy that encourages conservation, alternative sources, a modernized electricity grid, and more production here at home," he said. "Four years of debate is enough: I urge Congress to pass legislation that makes America more secure and less dependent on foreign energy."

Bush said his budget provides "provides strong funding for leading-edge technology -- from hydrogen-fueled cars, to clean coal, to renewable sources such as ethanol."

Bush remarked that renewable fuels and a comprehensive energy policy are "essential to expanding our economy, adding new jobs and for our country’s energy stability." National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) Presient Leon Corzine says, "Building the ethanol market will do just that and much more. Ethanol has already created more than 200,000 direct and indirect jobs, reduced gasoline prices, cut crude oil imports, increased farm income and reduced greenhouse gas emissions, but we have only just tapped the possibilities of what we can do with corn."

Clear Skies also mentioned

The President also touted his Clear Skies legislation that is designed to cut power plant pollution. Recently the Senate Environment and Public Works air quality subcommittee has been holding hearings on the initiative.

The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) says the legislation would stabilize demand for natural gas and benefit America’s farmers and ranchers by removing pressure on natural gas supplies, thus lowering agricultural production costs.

"Current burdensome, out-of-date air quality regulations exert constant pressure on natural gas supplies," AFBF President Bob Stallman says. "This artificially drives up demand and encourages fuel switching from other energy sources by manufacturers and even power companies."