Education Efforts Create Export Opportunities in Middle East

New techniques in feed milling spark livestock industry's interest.

Published on: Dec 12, 2008

The U.S. Grains Council conducts educational seminars across the globe to effectively educate end-users on ways to become more efficient. The purpose of these efforts, according to Chris Corry, USGC senior director of international operations for Rest of the World, is to increase the production of meat, milk and eggs, which in turn creates a need for feed grains.

"For nearly 50 years, the Council has worked with livestock industries across the globe to assist them increasing their production capabilities using the most cost efficient formula. As a result, we see a greater supply of food products available for consumers and a more prosperous middle class," he said. "All the while, opportunities are created for U.S. farmers to expand demand for their commodities."

Corry said there is a need to focus Council education efforts in the Middle East to benefit U.S. producers. Specifically, the absence of an up-to-date commercial feed industry in Iraq has limited the growth of its poultry sectors. Previous Council programs in the Middle East sparked the interest of end-users to learn more about the reconstruction of its commercial feed mill facilities and its comprehension of the newest feed manufacturing technologies and management techniques.

USGC Consultant Dr. Carl Reed of Kansas State University's International Grains Program, traveled to Amman, Jordan last week to conduct on site consultations and a virtual seminar from the Council's office in Amman to the Information Center for Poultry Excellence in Erbil, Iraq. The seminar was intended to encourage end-users to invest in sure-fire ways to maximize productivity and profitability.
"Plant visits in Jordan showed an industry where feed millers have developed their handling practices based on hearsay and intuition. Lack of basic information relative to temperature monitoring, fumigation, and other issues led to the use of inefficient practices. Although such practices can be observed most anywhere in the world, increased efficiency may be more critical in the emerging economies than in the mature ones," Reed said. "The Council has had a great deal of successes in strengthening efficiency in other developing countries such as Morocco, and we hope to have a success story in the region very soon."