Despite Drought, Northeast Still May Be Crop Garden Spot

Last week's storm front brought much needed, but spotty, rainfall to Northeast farms and generally improved crop conditions.

Published on: Jul 25, 2012

Every day, you hear about how bad the drought of 2012 is in the Midwest and West. But Northeast regional crop conditions are far more important to local and regional livestock producers.

So here's a quick peek at crop conditions in what may well be the garden spot of U.S. agriculture. Crop conditions as of last Friday were released on Monday by the National Agricultural Statistics Service reporters in Delaware, Maryland, New England, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

The good news was that there were plenty of days suitable for field work. The bad news was that most farmers would have preferred a few more rainy days.

Despite Drought, Northeast Still May Be Crop Garden Spot
Despite Drought, Northeast Still May Be Crop Garden Spot

Crop progress is generally far ahead of the five-year average. In Pennsylvania, for instance, corn silking was 75% complete last week compared to 50% last year and 54% for the five-year average.

Delaware and Maryland
NASS reporters in these Mid-Atlantic states noted that topsoil moisture ratings remained short in Delaware and adequate in Maryland. Subsoil ratings were short in both Delaware and Maryland.

Hay supplies were adequate in both states. Pasture conditions were fair in Maryland and poor in Delaware.  Corn and soybeans were in good to fair condition across both.