When Daughters Return To The Farm

In Willow Lake, S.D., three families are making the most having their daughters back on the farm.

Published on: Jul 25, 2013

Sons aren't the only ones coming back to the farm and ranch.

Daughters are returning, too.

In Willow Lake, S.D., three families are enjoying having their daughters back on the farm.

"It was something I always hoped would work out," says Kristin Vandersnick who returned to her family's farm with her husband, Matt. "I feel really fortunate to be able to live my dream."

Jennifer and her husband Corey Tellinghuisen are farming with Jennifer's parents, John and Julayne Thoreson.

"It's been a real good experience for everyone," John says. "I think it [farm transition] might be easier working with a son-in-law [than a son]."

Sons arent the only ones coming back to the farm and ranch.
Sons aren't the only ones coming back to the farm and ranch.

Art and Jane Fryslie, also of Willow Lake, have been transitioning their grain farming operation to oldest daughter Tara and her husband, Norman Vig.  Art, who is 70, says that he was ready to do less work physically. As a state legislator for the past 12 years, being less involved in the farm also allowed Art to devote more attention to that.

Communication is the key to making returning to the farm with a husband and family work, says Vandersnick . Her husband's family and her family have different ways of making decisions about their businesses. Her husband's family tends to dive into new things and make quick decisions. Her parents prefer to take time and think things over. "So I sometimes find myself in the middle as the translator between Matt and my dad," Kristin says.

The three women and their families all live within four miles of each other in Pleasant Township in Clark County.

Read more in the latest issue of Dakota Farmer. It's available online.