Corn and Soybean Plots Planted at Boone Site

Twenty-six new and current varieties will be on display by exhibitor lots.

Published on: May 19, 2010

The Farm Progress Show is all about the latest technology – in equipment, livestock and crops. That's why representatives of some of the leading seed companies gathered on the site of the 2010 Farm Progress Show at Boone, Iowa, on May 19 to plant the varieties of corn and soybeans they want show visitors to see in August.

One may think the middle of May is late to plant corn but that's not necessarily the case with the variety plots, notes Mark Lovig, Farm Progress Show operations manager. "These plots don't have to be harvested during the show and the companies want them to show well. So, it's actually better that they are planted a little later."

Corn that will be harvested during the field demonstrations at show time was planted April 13 and 14.

A Kinze 3660 planter was used to plant the plots. "It may be overkill," says Eric Ziehl, one of the host farmers. "But we used the planter to put in the corn for harvest and it worked well.
A Kinze 3660 planter was used to plant the plots. "It may be overkill," says Eric Ziehl, one of the host farmers. "But we used the planter to put in the corn for harvest and it worked well.

Eight companies planted eight varieties of soybeans and 18 varieties of corn in plots that will be located right behind their exhibit tents. "It makes it nice – company representatives can take interested show visitors right out to the plot by their tent to discuss different varieties," says Lovig.

Companies participating in this year's seed variety plots include Fontanelle, Stine, Agrotain, Soil Service, Syngenta, Curry, Allied Genetics and CPS-Dyna-Gro.

Kinze Manufacturing supplied the planter used to plant the plots.

A seed company representative pours a sample of one of his varieties in one of the planter units. Only a small amount of seed is needed to plant the 40-foot wide by 70-foot long plots.
A seed company representative pours a sample of one of his varieties in one of the planter units. Only a small amount of seed is needed to plant the 40-foot wide by 70-foot long plots.
Seed boxes were removed from the planter since such a small amount of seed is needed to plant the plot.
Seed boxes were removed from the planter since such a small amount of seed is needed to plant the plot.