Colorado State U Equine Lab Names New Leader

Jerry Black takes on key horse research, vet facility.

Published on: Mar 7, 2013

Two leaders in Colorado State University's renowned Equine Sciences program are gaining new responsibilities as part of a larger effort to   strengthen internationally recognized teaching and research on the Fort Collins campus.

Jerry Black, a veterinarian and associate professor in the Department of Animal Sciences, will become director of the CSU Equine Reproduction Laboratory, well known for its work in horse reproductive technologies and genetic preservation.

Black will retain his position as director of the undergraduate Equine Sciences program in the College of Agricultural Sciences. The undergrad program offers one of CSU's most popular majors, with about 400 enrolled students training for professions in the horse industry.

This rendering shows how the new Colorado State University Equine Reproduction Facility will appear on completion at Fort Collins, Colo.
This rendering shows how the new Colorado State University Equine Reproduction Facility will appear on completion at Fort Collins, Colo.

Jason Bummer, a professor in the Department of Animal Sciences, will fill a new role as associate director of the Equine Sciences program. He has been a faculty member in both the Equine Sciences undergraduate program and the Equine Reproduction Laboratory for more than 15 years.

"We're very pleased to have Dr. Black and Dr. Bruemmer take on new leadership roles in both our undergraduate equine program and the CSU Equine Reproduction Laboratory," says Craig Beyrouth, College of Animal Sciences dean.

"AS they help guide two of our stellar CSU horse programs, the university will strengthen and streamline programs to help meet the needs of students, horse owners and the horse industry."

Mark Stetter, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine, says the faculty shifts a step toward establishing a new CSU Equine Sciences and Health Institute that would draw together multiple equine programs.

"We envision an institute that will continue to conduct cutting-edge research which assists the equine community with everything from orthopedics to reproductive techniques, while also  educating our undergraduates and future veterinarians," he says.

A new 12,000-square-foot  Equine Reproduction Laboratory is under construction on the Foothills Campus and is expected to open in the spring.

Fire destroyed the original lab in 2011.