ASA Presents Research Priorities at NIFA Workshop

Food and agriculture education is needed across educational spectrum.

Published on: Apr 15, 2010
In Washington, D. C., the American Soybean Association submitted comments representing the interests of U.S. soybean farmers at the National Institute of Food and Agriculture workshop. ASA's comments identified some of the challenges and responsibilities of U.S. agriculture as translating the advances in plant biology to nutrition to address hunger and prevent disease; sustainable, economic supplies of energy; to improve plant resistance to environmental and biological stresses; and to increase the genetic potential for yield.

ASA President Rob Joslin, a soybean producer from
Sidney, Ohio, explains that the research priority of ASA is to translate the insight from plant biology and data generated from sequencing the soybean genome into tools for improving food and feed globally, growing crops more efficiently, and producing energy.

In an effort to translate research into applications, ASA supports effective food and agriculture education efforts across the educational spectrum, from research experiences for K-12 teachers through post-graduate fellowships. According to Joslin the shortage of researchers is not independent of the lack of knowledge among the general population about food production.