• John Vogel

    Time For An American 'Agrarian Spring' Over ObamaCare

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on August 30, 2013

    Pundits and experts, alike, wrestle with whether to fix or put ObamaCare out of its misery. But in listening to so many angry, common-sensed people of agricuIture, I believe it's due for a mercy killing. Here’s why a civilized American version of the "Arab Spring" is necessary to restore this country to "we the people". And, it must reach beyond ObamaCare. The Affordable Care Act isn't even out the chute, and it's already bleeding red ink &ndash…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Monsanto Did Not Pay Me to Write This

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on August 30, 2013

    Among many lovely conversations with readers at the Farm Progress Show this week, one exchange has had me thinking, ever since. He began with a statement: "You have written a couple columns about biotechnology." I confirmed that as true. He followed up with a question: "So you have to tow the party line? Or do you believe what you wrote?" I asked him to clarify and he responded, "Someone's paying you to write that? You don't really believe that…

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  • Willie Vogt

    Show Trends and Interesting Items

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on August 29, 2013

    As the Farm Progress Show winds down it's a good time to think about what's hot from the show. Of course this year that has a double-meaning with temps in the 90s all three days, but farmers work outside, a little hot weather was no deterrent for visitors. Of course what's a little heat among friends when there are 40 air conditioned exhibits on the lot, and enough breeze and shade to keep ahead of the weather? I was thinking more about cool stuff like the new Ag Leader…

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  • Holly Spangler

    #FPS13: Scenes

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on August 28, 2013

    As I write this, a group of editors are gathered in our Farm Progress Show Editorial Camper Trailer, which is nearly as glamorous as it sounds. But it's air conditioned, so we will take that. And it's equipped with cookies from Bobbi Vogt, wife of Willie Vogt. They are frozen and they are delicious. It's the end of the day but there's still work to be done. We're sorting photos, writing up new products, filing market copy. And let's be real: soaking up air…

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  • Curt Arens

    Identity Protection: I Can't Even Get My Own Private Information

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on August 27, 2013

    Because of the serious and very real threat of identity theft and the ability of hackers to access our private information and use it against us, we have become obsessed with developing a firewall to protect that information on the farm and in our personal lives. But sometimes, it seems the only ones we are protecting it from are ourselves. Almost everything we do online now is protected by a password. I can’t get into my landline phone, cell phone, bank account or dog’s…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    He Was Growing Cover Crops Before Covers Were Cool

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on August 27, 2013

    Buried in his bib overalls, Dick Thompson was first and foremost a farmer. But he thought like a top-notch researcher. The casket was open and he was wearing bib overalls like he always did. When I attended his funeral visitation last week, it was the first time I ever saw someone laid out for burial in bib overalls. It was appropriate. He was there so we could say goodbye to him just as we knew him and will remember him. Dick farmed with wife Sharon and family near Boone in central Iowa…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    The Worst Cornfield

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on August 26, 2013

    I saw what could be a 100-bushel-per-acre soybean field and a 285-bushel-per-acre cornfield last week in my travels through South Dakota and North Dakota (see my earlier blog post), but I also saw some fields that looked like they aren’t going to yield anything. The worst was near Ashley, N.D. See the photo. The corn probably had been planted on a gravel or sand ridge. Cornfields nearby looked better, but lots of fields from Selby, S.D., to Fargo, N.D., were firing in the…

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  • Tom Bechman

    The Farm Progress Show is Still a Shining Star

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on August 26, 2013

    The tradition which began 60 years ago in 1953 still lives. Some leaders for Prairie Farmer Co. wanted to give advertisers a way to show off new equipment. The group held a show not knowing what to expect, and tens of thousands of people showed up in a cornfield. They watched tractors of the day pull plows, and learned what was new. It caught on and this week in Decatur, Ill., it's now the premier outdoor farm show in the country. Some 600 exhibitors will show their wares. Some will…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Bound for the Farm Progress Show

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on August 25, 2013

    Hey, it's a beautiful week to head to the Farm Progress Show! Wait. What? It's some sort of irony, isn't it? Can't buy the heat units we need all summer, to the point that our field demo corn isn't even mature enough to harvest. And now during the week of the show, temperatures are forecasted to soar to the mid-90s. I don't even want to think about the heat index. The good news: there are more than a dozen air conditioned exhibit tents. And lots of…

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  • Tyler Harris

    Looking Back At The First Nebraska Tractor Tests

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on August 23, 2013

    With the launch of the new Gleaner combines in Wichita, and the Farm Progress Show next week, I've been spending a lot of time around new machinery lately. While progress is linear by definition, it's impossible to know how far we've progressed without looking at where we started and the steps we've taken along the way. As I've mentioned before, farmers love their antique iron, which is understandble, considering the major milestones along the way. Looking back…

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  • Josh Flint

    E85 Is Too Expensive (in the Metro-East)

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on August 23, 2013

    I’ve driven nearly 1,500 miles in the past two weeks. To make two winding trips around the state of Illinois, I rented a Ford Focus. Since my personal car is a Nissan, I was excited about taking full advantage of the Flex Fuel component that comes with Ford automobiles. Only one of the fuel stations along my travels offered E85. It was a station just a couple miles from my house. Since I was filling the car up before I returned it, I didn’t get a chance to see what sort…

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  • Tim White

    Another Great Moment In Ohio Farmer Golf History

    Buckeye Farm Beat

     by Tim White
     on August 23, 2013

      Bear with me. Once a year or so I write about my favorite sport – golf. And my favorite golfer – daughter Allie. She is in her first year as a professional playing on the Symetra Tour, which is a futures tour for the LPGA. She is always proud to wear her Ohio Farmer hat and every now and then she lets me caddy for her. It a real privilege and joy for me. For her it’s tolerating Dad for a couple of rounds in exchange for a day or two of free food and…

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  • Don McCabe

    September Nebraska Farmer Will Weigh Down Your Mailbox

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on August 22, 2013

    When this blog was written, we watched with relief as our September issue headed to the presses. It's our largest edition of the year in and of itself, but it also includes the 100-page-plus Husker Harvest Days show program. When you receive your September issue in your mailbox, you'll notice it immediately. It's big, of course, but it's also perfect bound and not saddle-stitched. Producing it takes a bite out of my summer in terms of travels to the country, and…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Soybeans Could Yield 100 Bushels Per Acre

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on August 22, 2013

    I saw a field of soybeans in South Dakota that I think could yield 100 bushels per acre. It was on the Kory Standy farm south of Platte. The soybeans were about chest high -- probably 4-½ feet tall -- and loaded from the top to bottom with pods. Last year, Standy won the South Soybean Yield Contest with an entry of nearly 90 bushels per acre. He’s thinking these will do a little better. What’s his secret? It’s part Mother Nature and part…

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  • Paula Mohr

    Conservation And Tithing: Doing What Is Right

    Northstar Notes

     by Paula Mohr
     on August 21, 2013

    A huge annual sporting event takes place northwest of Anoka, not far from my home, called Game Fair. At Game Fair, hosted by Armstrong Kennels—a hunter, a fisherman, a dog lover, a conservationist—can find just about anything that supports and encourages the sport. You could say it's sort of like Farmfest, as that has everything for farmers. The event also hosts educational sessions and panels. A few years ago, it featured a panel of gubernatorial candidates that…

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  • Willie Vogt

    Fall Farm Shows: Taking it all In

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on August 20, 2013

    It's almost time. My in-box is filling up with more appointments than an ER doc as companies want to tell the world just what they'll have on hand at the 2013 Farm Progress Show, and later at the 2013 Husker Harvest Days. This is a big time at our company, especially as we've added new publications that are now part of our bigger family. But at the end of the day, next week is about The Show. We're gearing up. We're making packing plans. We're planning travel…

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  • Curt Arens

    Crop Production: Too Much of a Good Thing is Not a Good Thing

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on August 20, 2013

    In recent weeks, I’ve attended University of Nebraska Extension and Nebraska Soybean Board herbicide-resistant weed workshops and soybean management field day events. Over the past couple of years, I’ve heard at least 20 different speakers at two dozen different crop production events talk about resistance issues in weeds, insects and diseases in crops. It is one of the biggest challenges for modern agriculture and crop production, but fortunately, this is not an obstacle that…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    Pursuit of 300 Kansas Farmer Also Water Conservationist

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on August 20, 2013

    Kansas farmer Mitchell Baalman was in the spotlight on Tuesday as his farm, FDK Partnership, was the first of six that are part of The Mosaic Company's Pursuit of 300 Farm Tour, which will take place over the next 10 days in six states, highlighting the company's effort to increase yields to 300 bushels of corn per acre. To Kansas farmers, Baalman is known not only for his innovation and willingness to try to things to improve the agronomics, economics and efficiency of his…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Caroline Spangler, Kindergartner

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on August 20, 2013

    Dear Caroline, Today is your first day of kindergarten. You were so excited; I was so relieved that you were excited. It's your nature to ease into a situation (usually in my arms) before throwing yourself into the excitement of something new. And so we've spent time over the past year warming up to kindergarten. Whenever we were in the school building, I asked if you'd like to visit kindergarten and Aunt Coco (because how many kids are so fortunate to have their very own…

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  • T.J. Burnham

    What's Wrong With This?

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on August 19, 2013

    Maybe it is just me. Has anyone else wondered why we need immigration reform to entice out-of-country workers to the farm when many of our citizens of the U.S. in the low income echelon are looking for work? I know the answer is, of course, that most of the denizens of this nation find farm labor jobs too difficult for them to perform. That's been a social dilemma for lots of years, and one we can consider axiomatic in the social fabric. It creates a gap that has become accepted…

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  • Tom Bechman

    More Positives Than Negatives From Indiana State Fair

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on August 19, 2013

    The 2013 Indiana State Fair passes into history as the fair that helped re-establish the tradition of attending a great state fair. The lingering tragedy of 2011 when the grandstand stage collapsed plus 2012's unbearable heat did a number on the last two fairs. Unusually cool, favorable weather helped the 2013 version rebound in attendance and spirit. We're going to report our opinion here – observations made from what we saw and from people we talked with. This isn't a…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    Drought KO'd in Soggy Eastern Kansas

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on August 18, 2013

    For the first time in a month, there are no thunderstorms in the immediate forecast. Whew! We might actually get the yard cleaned up. Traveling around central Kansas this week, the green is absolutely amazing and the Flint Hills are gorgeous. And drought, at least for now, appears conquered in the eastern two-thirds of the state. With a couple of days of sunshine, we’re seeing the river flooding subside, though there are definitely producers who have lost some of their corn and…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Birthday Party For A Rare And Beautiful Barn

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on August 17, 2013

    One hundred and thirty years ago, Joshua Secrest and barnbuilder Frank Longerbeam sat around a kitchen table on the farmstead near Iowa City, Iowa and planned one of the largest round barns in the country. The graceful bell-shaped roof is unique – there is none like it anywhere. "This barn is a wonderful photo opportunity," says Rich Tyler, a barn historian and one of the people planning this upcoming event. On Sunday August 24, 2013, a birthday party for this Iowan treasure…

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  • Jessica Lavicky

    CSA vs Farmers Market: Which One Is Right For You?

    The Daily Dig

     by Jessica Lavicky
     on August 16, 2013

    I am well into my 20 weeks of being a first-time receiving member of a Community Supported Agriculture program. And I am liking it - well most of it. Why do CSA you ask? Well it all started with my strong urge to have a garden. One problem. There was no place to put it. I grew up with having access to a huge garden. When I say huge, I mean enormous. We had endless abundance of wax beans, lettuce, beets, peas, asparagus, kohlrabi, cucumbers and tomatoes just to name a few. I could…

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  • Josh Flint

    Fresh Local Food? Not So Much

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on August 16, 2013

    Yesterday, my wife reminded me that a “farmer” would be coming by to deliver us a box of fresh, local produce. A “What?” “Remember, I told you…” type of conversation ensued. If you’re married, you probably have these daily. Anyhow, she reminded me that she joined some coworkers and purchased a food allotment from a local farmer’s market. It was a one-time thing – not a community supported agriculture deal. To say the…

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  • Tim White

    Crops To The Clinic Team Rides For A Cure

    Buckeye Farm Beat

     by Tim White
     on August 15, 2013

    While all of the 6,700 bicycle riders in the Pelotonia fund raising event in Columbus last week were pedaling to defeat cancer, there was one team that is looking for ways consuming food can help prevent the disease. About 20 members of the Ohio State University research group calling themselves “Crops to the Clinic” rode in the event. Their work is housed in the Center for Advanced Functional Foods Research and Entrepreneurship. See their website online. It is a multidisciplinary…

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  • Tyler Harris

    Ag Is Something State Rivals Have In Common

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on August 14, 2013

    It's not often that I make it out to my old stomping grounds in Johnson County, Iowa. When I do, like I did last week, it's usually a several-day trip, being about a five-hour drive from Kansas City. I've seen plenty of ANF insignia all over Iowa, but I definitely notice a higher concentration when I make the trip out east. I'm not referring to Abercrombie and Fitch – as most Iowa farmers (and many Hawkeyes) know, this stands for America Needs Farmers. Most people…

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  • Paula Mohr

    Farmers Need To Be Seen More And Heard

    Northstar Notes

     by Paula Mohr
     on August 14, 2013

    With Minnesota's agriculture sector providing more than 340,000 jobs for the state and creating $75 billion in economic activity, one would think that there would be plenty of news and feature stories for the general media to cover. One would think that thoughtful journalists would go beyond rewriting financial press releases or covering the latest water quality press conference. No, farmers attending Farmfest who listened to an eight-member media panel learned that agriculture…

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  • Curt Arens

    More Farm Reflections on Fair Time

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on August 13, 2013

    With county fairs, including our own, winding down in Nebraska, and the State Fair in Grand Island just ready to heat up, my penchant for observation kicks into overdrive. The journalist part of me just can’t help but see things from a wider view. The observation mode doesn’t have an “off switch,” so even when I’m doing family things or farm things away from my duties at the magazine, I’m still interested in what people are doing and saying and thinking…

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  • Don McCabe

    Ranchers Like Homer Buell Demonstrate 'Innovations On The Land'

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on August 12, 2013

    Homer Buell is like the vast majority of Sandhills ranchers I know. He and the other members of Buell family of Rose have an abiding love of ranching and cattle and the grass, soil, water and wildlife resources they've protected through the generations. I've been to the Shovel Dot Ranch and seen the grazing management practices implemented by Homer and his family, including wife, Darla, and son, Chad. I saw, too, when the family a year ago was selected as Nebraska's winner in…

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  • Holly Spangler

    When Chicago Moms Talk Back

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on August 12, 2013

    With Ag Day at the Illinois State Fair set to kick off today and with a Chicago mom blog making the news recently, it feels like a good time to talk a little about Illinois Farm Families. It was three years ago on this day that five Illinois farm and commodity groups announced they had banded together to form the Illinois Farm Families program. At that time, it was a first-ever coalition of farm groups: Illinois Pork, Illinois Beef, Illinois Corn, Illinois Soybean and Illinois Farm…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Is a Monsanto Ultra-Early Corn Coming Soon?

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on August 12, 2013

    A new ultra-early corn hybrid -- the first from Monsanto’s Canada Corn Expansion Project -- may be on the market in just two or three years, says Mike Claywell, Monsanto's northern test lead specialist. At a meeting I attended at Dekalb’s Glyndon, Minn., plant breeding station (Dekalb is one of Monsanto’s brands), Claywell said that a new early-maturing line developed in Ontario looks very good. If it performs as expected this season, it will be developed quickly…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Will A Good Corn Year Slow Land Prices?

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on August 12, 2013

    Purdue University just issued a report which claims that in a recent survey of bankers and farm managers, land values went up an average of 17% statewide in the past 12 months. Craig Dobbins, who helps conduct the survey, says that's staggering considering that drought produced drastic yield reductions. Farming isn't just about yield – it's also about price. Limited supplies nationwide drove corn and soybean prices higher last fall. Farm incomes went up. In fact…

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  • T.J. Burnham

    Heading For The Beach A Nice Outing For Stir-Crazy Family

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on August 12, 2013

    One of the nice things about summer is the long, long warm days that pull you to go outside. That is, if the heat wave isn’t soaring in the high 90s! Getting folks ready to go to the beach is always a busy task, but the rewards of summer sun and sand are worth the effort. I decided long ago that if we were going to drive 100 miles to the Pacific Ocean shore, we would stay at least two nights to make it a mini-vacation and not a fast turnaround trip. After a lengthy stay, I…

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  • Fran O

    The End Of An Era

    Badger View

     by Fran O'Leary
     on August 11, 2013

    This summer was a lot like any other for my family with most of July and the first week of August focused on preparing for and attending county fair and state fair. But unlike other years, this was the last county fair and state fair my sons will show at. My twins, Matthew and Nathan, are 19 and will turn 20 in November, so their 4-H and showing careers have come to an end. They began showing registered Holstein dairy calves at the Fond du Lac County Fair in 1998 when they were…

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  • Willie Vogt

    From Viral Video to Vintage Tractor App

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on August 9, 2013

    A few weeks ago I alerted readers to the fact that Max Armstrong was going viral...really. The veteran farm broadcaster, who has always had a passion for vintage tractors, is turning that love into a vintage tractor app you can download to your smartphone for free. This is not a simple picture app, it's an interactive tool you can use to keep up on Max's Tractor Shed, hear Midwest Digest reports and more. Below, I've embedded a little commercial promoting the app. Farm…

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  • John Vogel

    Life Can Change In A Blink

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on August 9, 2013

    Last week, while traveling in New York's North Country, I was reminded just how quickly life can profoundly change. And, I'm not talking about winning a lottery. A week ago, a very serious accident on a dairy farm shook every member of a widely respected family – the Porters of Porterdale Farms at Adams Center – and their surrounding community. The family, if you'll recall, graced American Agriculturist's cover in August 2011 after being named…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Farm Bill Shopping List

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on August 8, 2013

    Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) recently sent a letter to the House and Senate Ag Committee leaders listing 15 things she wants them to include in the Farm Bill. It’s a pretty good list. The 15 things are: Create an option for a farm-level commodity program. To ensure the program reflects the losses that occur for North Dakota growers and growers in other states with large-sized counties, it is important the option to elect into a farm-level program is provided. Each year North…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Always Plenty New To See And Do At Iowa State Fair

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on August 8, 2013

    Visiting the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines is the highlight of the summer for many people, an August tradition. Many of those who exhibit at the fair work toward this event year-round raising livestock, growing crops, vegetables, flowers and perfecting family recipes. Year after year people return with friends and family to experience Iowa's great celebration, a salute to the state's best in entertainment, agriculture, industry and achievement. To plan your visit, you'll find…

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  • Curt Arens

    Top Five Things Farm Kids Learn at the Fair

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on August 6, 2013

    It’s county fair week around our household. That means total chaos, even more than the usual craziness and confusion. We don’t have a million 4-H projects to cart to the fair, but with three calves and numerous other projects being exhibited by three of our children, we know the week will be filled with fun, and more than a few learning opportunities. Here are a few things we’ve learned in the past from experiences at our annual county fair… 1. Calves act…

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  • Tyler Harris

    Antique Tractors Aren't Just For Show

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on August 6, 2013

    Last week I had the opportunity to tour the northwest Missouri countryside on the 2013 Northwest Missouri Young Farmer and Young Farm Wives Tour. The tour kicked off at College Park Pavilion at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville with an antique tractor show, complete with Allis-Chalmers, Farmalls, John Deeres, and Olivers. These restored antiques are more than just eye candy for farmers, especially those who grew up with them. Farmers love their iron, but these antique…

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  • Josh Flint

    An Easy Sweet Corn Casserole Recipe the Family Will Love

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on August 5, 2013

    Sweet corn is one of the best parts of summer. When we lived in Decatur, sweet corn was abundant and delicious. Now that we’re in St. Clair County, it’s a bit harder to come by fresh-picked ears. So, when Erie farmer Paul Young offered me several ears last week, I graciously accepted. He really loaded me up. Typically, we soak the ears in water for about an hour, and then toss them on the grill. Once the husks are black, we peel them back and add butter and salt. It’s…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    No Farm Bill, No Sugarbeets Up North

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on August 5, 2013

    I didn’t see a lot of difference in the farms when I crossed the border into Manitoba last week to attend a Wolf Trax field day. Wolf Trax makes micronutrients that fertilizer dealers market across the U.S. On the North Dakota side of the border, there were a lot of corn, soybean, wheat, canola and sugarbeet fields. On the Manitoba side, it was nearly the same, but the sugarbeet fields were missing. Manitoba’s sugarbeet industry dried up in the late 1990s. According…

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  • Tom Bechman

    What Will Indiana State Fair Be Like Next Year?

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on August 5, 2013

    Everyone knows the 2013 Indiana State Fair is centered on life without the Coliseum. It's like the Colts playing football in the parking lot because Lucas Oil Stadium is being renovated. Well, maybe it's not that drastic, but having horse hitch shows in a new arena too small for anyone to be in to watch the shows, and holding the big draw livestock events in cramped quarters isn't exactly the way you would want a state fair to go. People who are coping assume this is a…

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  • Paula Mohr

    Freedom To Farm, Freedom Of Speech

    Northstar Notes

     by Paula Mohr
     on August 4, 2013

    Another anti-farm editorial appeared in the Star Tribune this week, penned by a columnist who cited opinion voiced by two vegetarians. The author held up "factory farming" as an example of the horror that animals face in his attempt to defend animal rights. Really? That is so 1990s. That's when livestock farms that survived the 1980s started to expand. They were building new facilities, managing new employees, adding more livestock and accumulating acreage…

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  • Willie Vogt

    Tracking Growing Degree Days?

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on August 2, 2013

    And now from the shameless self-promotion department comes a little help. If you're trying to track growing degree days we have a smart phone app for that. The program we developed with our partners iNet Solutions has been on the market for a few years now and during the scorching Drought of 2012 the program wasn't too much help. However, with the rain-delayed 2013 season, knowing just how far off you are from normal, or how many accumulated growing degree units you have since…

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  • Curt Arens

    Families Growing Our Food: Rebuilding the Land After Floods

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on August 2, 2013

    Curt’s Comments:   Farmers are hardworking folks. They deal with challenges and potential tragedies every day. It is a part of depending on the land for a living. In 2011, farmers along the Missouri River were dealt a heightened blow they hadn’t counted on. The flooding along the river that summer was much worse than anyone could have predicted, and there was very little notice beforehand to allow folks to prepare. Yet, farmers like Scott Olson of Tekamah have been…

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  • Mindy Ward

    Support Local Famers, Buy Food

    Show-Me Life

     by Mindy Ward
     on August 1, 2013

    It was simple question at the Missouri Farmers Care meeting between local farmers and consumers, "How can we help you?" And Pike County hog farmer Jim Fisher gave a quick response, "Buy food." Fisher is part owner in Fisher Hog Farms near Middletown, Mo. There along with his family, they nurture 2,600 sows that produce roughly 65,000 pigs per year. Fisher was joined that evening by cattleman Bill McLaren, dairy farmer Donna Telle and row crop and cattlewoman…

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  • T.J. Burnham

    Here Come The Hot August Nights

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on August 1, 2013

    At a time when the world seems to be plugged in, let's take out the earplugs,  fingers off the keyboards, and just relate to the good life. August, when summer gets serious, is a great time to take advantage of nature's bounty and hike a river or climb a mountain. :Pull out the tent and  find the coolers and head for the camping ground with the family for a real experience rather than a virtual one. My favorite things are camping, hiking and photographing the…

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  • Don McCabe

    Plenty Of Outdoor Classrooms To Choose From This Summer

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on August 1, 2013

    I can remember in past years that late July and August were a bit more laid back compared to today in the field day arena. The so-called "slow news" times of late summer don't exist anymore. And, of course, the lazy, hazy days of summer never existed for farmers. For ag writers, the calendar is seemingly more packed than ever this year with crop production events sponsored by commodity associations, UNL Extension and the seed industry. It's a testament to the fact…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    More Sprayer Smarts Needed With Monsanto's Newest Biotech Crop

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on August 1, 2013

    The new biotech Roundup Ready Xtend Crop System is at least two growing seasons away -- thanks to court-ordered delay for an environmental impact study -- but the training blitz has started. I’ve recently been to Monsanto and Asgrow/DeKalb field days where company representatives talked about what it’s going to take to use the Roundup Ready Xtend Crop System successfully. Roundup Ready® 2 Xtend Soybeans will contain the Genuity® Roundup Ready 2 Yield® trait…

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