• Mindy Ward

    Animal Activists, Leave My Kid Alone

    Show-Me Life

     by Mindy Ward
     on February 28, 2014

    Yes, I monitor my daughter’s Facebook account. And today, I am not pleased at the level animal activists, more specifically the vegan community, will go to cajole young teens into their lifestyle. As I scroll through her newsfeed, I run across one of those “Like this page” requests. Its icon is a cute little cartoon pig. Its Facebook page name is “SaveFarmAnimals.” Its category is education. So, I click through. What I find is a page that has a photo of a kitten…

    Continue Reading


  • Curt Arens

    Out on a Limb: Tips for Proper Tree Pruning

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on February 28, 2014

    In this special Out on a Limb blog entry, I will address a few tips on proper pruning techniques. At one of the UNL tree care workshops I’ve attended over the years, I have heard foresters say many times that the best time to prune a tree is when you have time to do it. In other words, prune whenever it is convenient, and your saw is sharp. However, the actual best time for most broadleaf trees is in winter or early spring, before the trees display buds. So, that time is drawing near…

    Continue Reading


  • Rod Swoboda

    Your Comments Are Wanted On New GMO Seeds

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on February 28, 2014

    USDA on February 24, 2014 announced it is extending the public comment period until March 11 on whether to allow the sale of corn and soybean seeds that are part of a new weed control system from Dow AgroSciences. The new seeds are genetically engineered to resist both glyphosate herbicide and 2,4-D. Officials of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service say the extension is provided in response to stakeholder requests for additional time to gather public input. In early January…

    Continue Reading


  • T.J. Burnham

    Repetitive TV Commercials, Snowbells & Little Sounds

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on February 28, 2014

    I tried so danged hard to watch the Olympics to the awards ceremonies each night, but by 10:30 or so, the incessantly repeated commercials – doubled up as the end of the show approached – put me to sleep in my recliner. I would think advertisers might be embarrassed at the barrage of unchanging spots they produce each night. By the time I have watched one of them a half dozen times, I actually cringe when it comes back again. Is that good advertising, or do some people promise…

    Continue Reading


  • Holly Spangler

    The Friday Five: Watch, Don't Read

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on February 28, 2014

    Live from the 2014 Commodity Classic, a short list of videos that are worth the watch. Take a look! Farmland: Remember Food, Inc? King Corn? Chipotle and their series? Farmland is agriculture's answer to the documentaries that have cast the industry in a certain (dark) light. Funded by USFRA and directed by Academy-Award-winning director James Moll, Farmland is set to be released later this spring. In the meantime, this link takes you to a trailer for the movie. And it's…

    Continue Reading


  • Don McCabe

    A Network That Works For Irrigators

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on February 27, 2014

    Neighboring farmers have worked together for years. They not only have helped each other out, but they've worked on projects with Extension educators, crop consultants and company reps. Today, we call that "partnering." One of the best partnerships I've seen in this state in some time is the Nebraska Agricultural Water Management Network. It's impressive what this irrigation network, in existence since 2005, has done and what it will do in the future in the area of more…

    Continue Reading


  • P.J. Griekspoor

    Supporting Rural Kansas Is Marci Penner's Mission

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on February 26, 2014

    If any of you out there haven’t heard of the amazing work done by the Kansas Sampler Foundation, consider this your invitation to learn. The Kansas Sampler Foundation is perhaps the best example of grassroots activism and community service in the whole country and its co-founder, Marci Penner has my vote year in and year for “Person of the Year” in Kansas. The Foundation has a mission to support and promote rural Kansas communities and help them thrive. It is the force…

    Continue Reading


  • Lon Tonneson

    Blizzard Surprise

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on February 26, 2014

    Ten minutes ago I walked out to the mailbox and the sky was blue, the sun was shining through bright white clouds and there was only a little snow drifting across the highway. Now, the farmstead is socked in. I can’t see much further than the barn, which is a few hundred feet from the house. Beyond it, the world dissolves into white. Had I lived out here in the Red River Valley 125 years ago, I probably wouldn’t have survived the Children’s Blizzard that hit in a similar…

    Continue Reading


  • Curt Arens

    Opportunities Raising Pigs

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on February 25, 2014

    There was a time, not that long ago, when nearly every farm in our neighborhood raised pigs. We all had a few sows and either sold feeder pigs or finished out what we raised. This was only 15 years ago. Times have changed. It’s tough these days to be raising pigs, but the fact is, there are great opportunities down the road. At the Nebraska Pork Producers Association Pork Industry Day in Norfolk last week, every producer I talked with was concerned deeply about PED virus. Mike…

    Continue Reading


  • Willie Vogt

    Looking Back, and Ahead at Ag Equipment

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on February 25, 2014

    Here's a short apology loyal reader - sorry. Conferences and shows and duties have limited my ability to blog lately and I'll work to get back on track in the coming weeks. From winter meetings to big events an ag journalist's time can be in short supply, yet there are pages to fill and websites to populate. All to help keep you informed. The past few weeks have been interesting. The National Farm Machinery Show was filled with plenty of new products and information. From faster…

    Continue Reading


  • Josh Flint

    Here's the Big Reason Blender Pumps Haven't Caught On

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on February 25, 2014

    A week after the National Ethanol Conference wrapped up in Orlando, I keep coming back to two things. First, it was 80 degrees F down there! It was still in the 50s when I flew back to St. Louis. And, now it’s back to winter. I think most everyone will agree – spring can’t get here soon enough.  The second thing is this little fact. The average fuel station proprietor only makes a 3-cent-per-gallon profit on gas. That means on an average fuel transaction, the proprietor…

    Continue Reading


  • Holly Spangler

    Hey, Remember Home Ec?

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on February 25, 2014

    Last Friday, I sat through a USFRA Food Dialogues panel, where they were asking and answering the question, "Who is shaping America's nutrition choices?" They talked about media and commercials. They talked about food production, specifically land, water and energy. They talked about our crazy-busy lifestyle and processed foods. They talked about a knowledge gap in food production, and about dieticians. And I had a crazy thought: what about the fact that (a lot of) Americans…

    Continue Reading


  • Mike and Sheilah Reskovac

    Nothing Says 'I Love You' More Than A Farm Machinery Show Trip

    Two Hearts, One Harvest

     by Mike and Sheilah Reskovac
     on February 24, 2014

    Nothing says “I love you” like a trip to the National Farm Machinery Show. But piles of work had to be moved first. So about 11 p.m. on February 13, we (being Sheilah’s sister, brother-in-law, niece and nephew) piled into a big old Toyota Sequoia and headed out for Louisville, Ky. Mike: As if I don’t have enough to do, I started to plow snow for the township on an “as needed basis". Sheilah: As needed, my big left toe! More like every day this winter! Mike…

    Continue Reading


  • Lon Tonneson

    The Meat Racket

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on February 24, 2014

    The question of whether vertical integration in the poultry and swine industries, and packer concentration in the beef industry, is good or bad is a moot point. It’s how we do business today and it is here to stay. But you might like the new book, “The Meat Racket,” by Christopher Leonard. It’s about how Tyson Foods was founded and how it grew. What I like best about the book are the stories about the farmers — especially John Tyson, who founded the company. He…

    Continue Reading


  • Tom Bechman

    Calendar Moves Quickly Once March 1 Arrives

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on February 24, 2014

    Three months of cold, snow and ice are enough to make anybody think spring will never get here. But it will. Just look on the calendar. The 28 days of February are nearly gone. This coming Saturday is March 1. And once March arrives, it seems like the calendar slips into overdrive. The days fall off quickly. If your target planting date is April 15, that means you could be planting in just over six weeks, assuming the snow is gone and conditions are right. The snow will be gone. Whether…

    Continue Reading


  • Mindy Ward

    I Blame The FFA For Changes In Rural Youth

    Show-Me Life

     by Mindy Ward
     on February 21, 2014

    Who hasn’t driven up the driveway at least one time to find livestock standing in their front yard? But multiple times in one week can only lend itself to the family tradition of playing the blame game. It all starts with the question, “Who left the gate open?” Typically, what follows is the inquiry into who was the last one in the barn, who didn’t secure the gate with the wire or why did you not even think to stand the gate up? Then there is the denial, denial, and…

    Continue Reading


  • Rod Swoboda

    Amazing History Of Food And Farming

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on February 21, 2014

    Students and adults alike will enjoy exploring the impressive new educational exhibits at the World Food Prize Foundation Hall of Laureates in downtown Des Moines. Thoughtful and well-planned, the Educational Exhibits Wing rivals what you would expect at the Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C. The interactive exhibits are a fun, interesting way to learn about the history of food and agriculture, about famous Iowans and to gain a better understanding of the global challenges related to…

    Continue Reading


  • Holly Spangler

    The Friday Five: Olympic Edition

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on February 20, 2014

    The Olympics are trucking onward, the snow is melting, the creeks are flooding, the calves are coming, and it's National FFA week. And so here we are, back again this week, with five links. If you've got the time to spare, these are worth the read. A Farmer's Challenge to Chipotle: Agriculturalist Ryan Goodman penned this opinion piece for CNN's Eatocracy blog. It's a well-thought out response to the Chipotle video series that's critical of modern food production. Side…

    Continue Reading


  • T.J. Burnham

    Olympic Games Bring Cheers, Tears

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on February 20, 2014

    Forget about the latest episode of “Hawaii 50,” I am no longer in control of my clicker! The family only wants to watch the Olympics. Sure, I love the games as much as anyone, but the commercials usually dull my brain and quell the excitement about 9:30 each night, and I am ready to go to bed. All those new Super Bowl ads are repeated with incessant punishment, and they take the fun out of watching the Olympic sports. We're cheering with each gold, silver and bronze, and even…

    Continue Reading


  • P.J. Griekspoor

    It's A Batten Down the Lawn Furniture Kind of Day

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on February 20, 2014

    You know you live in Kansas when the National Weather Service issues a hazardous weather warning for high winds and suggests you batten down the lawn furniture and garbage cans. Much of southern Kansas is experiencing constant winds of 35 to 45 miles per hour and gusts to 60 as I write this. There are six schools in Wichita without power. Most importantly for me, the picnic table on the deck (complete with umbrella) is on it’s side – again. You might wonder why I simply…

    Continue Reading


  • Tyler Harris

    UAV Potential For Ranchers

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on February 19, 2014

    Flying a UAV across a room is one way to get peoples' attentions. It sure got my attention at the 2014 Global Ag Symposium in Concordia a few weeks ago, when natural resource engineer for University of Missouri Extension in Boone County, Kent Shannon piloted a PJI Phantom across the stage of the Concordia Community Center. Farmers love looking at the newest equipment and technology, and UAVs, or unmanned aerial vehicles, are definitely one of the key topics heard in the precision ag sector…

    Continue Reading


  • Curt Arens

    Truman Prepared for the Presidency by Working the Family Farm

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on February 18, 2014

    Last year about this time I wrote about President Calvin Coolidge, who, as Vice-President to Warren Harding, was working on his father’s farm in Vermont when he learned of Harding’s untimely death. He took the oath of office by lamplight in his father’s farmhouse, with his father, who was a notary public, officiating. This year during Presidents’ Day week, I recall another unlikely President, who started out life working his family’s Missouri farm. The hard work…

    Continue Reading


  • Tom Bechman

    Will They Need to Clear Snow for the Indy 500?

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on February 17, 2014

    My daughter flew in from Minneapolis a couple days ago. We went to the airport to meet her. Snowdrifts along I-70 were a mile high…well, almost. They had piled a huge mountain of snow after clearing parking lots and other areas. It got me to thinking. When will this winter end? How long before that snow melts? Stuck in this cycle of most days in the teens, with a day now and then sneaking above 30 degrees, it's hard to imagine it ever getting warm again. Will they still be pushing…

    Continue Reading


  • Mindy Ward

    10 Reasons A Famer Is An Ideal Valentine

    Show-Me Life

     by Mindy Ward
     on February 14, 2014

    Famers are great Valentines. However, it takes a special person to truly understand what makes a farmer, well, so lovable. If you are searching for your Valentine, look no further. Here is the list of why a farmer is an ideal Valentine. 1. Loves animals. What is more adorable than a man who loves animals? Well, one who loves animals enough to allow you to keep not just the dog or cat, but also a calf, lamb, goat, or pig in the house. A woman can bring home any stray and a farmer will let her…

    Continue Reading


  • Rod Swoboda

    Super-Sized Equipment Not Suited for Highly Erodible Ground

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on February 14, 2014

    A regular contributor to Wallaces Farmer magazine, Jason Johnson has written an article that will appear in our March issue about how to match machinery size to soil conservation needs when farming Iowa's steep slopes. As machinery gets wider, particularly planters, this is getting to be a big concern in local soil and water conservation district offices in the state. The increasing size of farm machinery is making it more difficult for row crop farmers to maneuver Iowa's hillier…

    Continue Reading


  • Holly Spangler

    The Friday Five: Worth the Read

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on February 14, 2014

    It's been one of those weeks where I've seen a lot of good stuff float across the Internet. Granted, a lot was in response to bad stuff on the Internet, but alas, that is the way of agriculture these days. So if you have a few minutes to spare, these are worth the read. 1. Dr. Oz's GMO Global Conspiracy…Debunked:  Point-by-point, Katie Pratt offers up the facts that Dr. Oz (surprisingly missed during his show this week on "Stealth GMOs," designed to leave…

    Continue Reading


  • Willie Vogt

    Faster Planter In Your Future?

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on February 13, 2014

    The coolest part of covering agricultural machinery is the continuous innovation we see across the industry. Need to plant narrower rows, then harvest them? No problem, engineers and innovators have solved that. Want to harvest soybeans or wheat faster? Bring on the draper header. Seeking faster, more efficient tillage? Vertical tillage is the answer. Most of these technologies are focused on getting more per acre or being more productive. One key area where there's been a challenge is…

    Continue Reading


  • Holly Spangler

    She Was a Good Farm Dog

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on February 12, 2014

    Our dog, Mandy, had to be put down yesterday. She was a border collie and she was nearly 15 years old. She was my gift to my husband on our first anniversary. We drove up to Galena for the weekend and I told him we needed to swing through Lanark on our way home, for his present. She was one of a half dozen roly-poly puppies raised by farmers on the edge of town. We brought her home and we loved her. Mandy loved to play in the water and she herded the barn cats, which annoyed them beyond all…

    Continue Reading


  • T.J. Burnham

    Real Winter Visits the North Pacific Coast

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on February 11, 2014

    I am looking at a foot of snow on the ground outside the window of the vast Western Farmer-Stockman campus. What's unusual about it is that we don't get snow here in the northern Pacific much. But it hit with a vengeance on Feb. 6. School administrators screamed "Snow Day," and thousands of students responded with "Yes!" Funny thing is that when I was growing up in Michigan, this kind of a day would be a mild event. People around here don't know ice storms and…

    Continue Reading


  • Curt Arens

    Do We Get Style Points in How We Present the Farm Message?

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on February 11, 2014

    Have you ever walked into a store looking for an item, only to be bombarded by a sales person who follows you around and pushes items in a way that completely turns you away from that store? I think almost everyone has had this experience at one time or another. As a consumer, you may been perfectly willing to purchase your item from that store, but because of how the item was presented by the sales person, and how pushy they were about the sales experience, you took your business…

    Continue Reading


  • John Vogel

    What's In The Farm Bill 'Bag' For You

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on February 11, 2014

    Congress finally got the Agricultural Act of 2014 done – more than two years late! Just maybe it happened for fear that President Obama would write a Farm Bill via executive order. That threat may still come, as some critics hope and suggest. In the last two weeks, I've received hundreds of emails praising Congress and outlining their favorite pieces of "bacon" in the bill – and some panning it. So here's a quick look at some of what might be most tasty to…

    Continue Reading


  • Paula Mohr

    I'm Dreaming Of A Windy Spring

    Northstar Notes

     by Paula Mohr
     on February 11, 2014

    We're a hardy bunch, those of us who reside in the North Star State. We deal with things like brittle temps and mosquito clouds. Well, sorta. I have to admit that I am getting a bit tired of these sub-zero temperatures. I heard the other night on the news that as of Feb. 5, the mercury dipped to zero or colder 38 times thus far this winter in the Twin Cities. That's the most at or below zero readings since the winter of 1995-96. The report went on to compare the winter of…

    Continue Reading


  • Tom Bechman

    Farmers Like the New Farm Bill; Activists Cry Foul

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on February 10, 2014

    Anyone who pretends they're an expert on the 2014 Farm Bill that just passed just might be pulling your leg. The bill is full of details, and Purdue University ag economists say that how the rules are fleshed out will go a long way toward determining the impact of the bill. Direct payments were eliminated, but crop insurance was "strengthened," or at least that's what the buzz on the Internet says. The 800-pound gorilla that the House wanted to take out, food stamps, is still…

    Continue Reading


  • Holly Spangler

    Confessions of a Farm Wife: Vol. 5

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on February 10, 2014

    It got a little more serious around the kitchen counter for this, our fifth podcast. We covered snow days and bored children and exasperated (and cold) husbands last time, but as I wrote in my February column, virtually every economist at virtually every farm meeting this winter has assured us that corn prices are settling in for a new (low) era. Ohio State University ag economist Matt Roberts assured farmers last month that while the last six years have been a time of unprecedented…

    Continue Reading


  • Lon Tonneson

    Big Hurdles For Industrial Beets

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on February 10, 2014

    What the heck are the industrial beet guys smoking? They’re proposing farmers grow beets as a feedstock for ethanol at a time when the EPA is proposing to cut the amount of renewable fuel sold in the U.S., and when the ethanol industry is still reeling from the food-versus-fuel debate. It makes no sense to me to try to produce more ethanol if the Renewable Fuel Standard is cut. New beet ethanol plants would have to compete with existing corn ethanol refineries. Also, ethanol’s…

    Continue Reading


  • Rod Swoboda

    Ethanol Industry Set To Fight EPA On Blend Rule

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on February 7, 2014

    The Iowa Renewable Fuels Association's annual meeting last week at Altoona was sharply focused on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's proposal to reduce the volume requirements in the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA wants to reduce the amount of ethanol and biodiesel required to be blended into the nation's gasoline and diesel fuel supply.  The RFS, a federal law passed by Congress in 2007, sets annual volume requirements for biofuels. Congress enacted the RFS to increase…

    Continue Reading


  • Holly Spangler

    Calves in the House and Kids in the Barn

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on February 7, 2014

    It's funny the things that will catch people's attention. Last week, I did an interview with John Cody, a Chicago broadcaster with WBBM radio. He had read this blog post by Betsie Estes, a former Field Mom with the Illinois Farm Families program. Betsie blogs at Super Suburbs and is a fabulous young suburban mother I've gotten to know after meeting at Larson Farms a couple years ago. We've become social media friends, and after seeing one of my posts about caring for livestock…

    Continue Reading


  • T.J. Burnham

    Hemp or Marijuana, the Similarities Bring Questions

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on February 6, 2014

    In the January issue of Western Farmer-Stockman I included an editorial asking readers how they felt about the marijuana issue since two of the states we cover – Washington and Colorado – have legalized recreational use and production. What happened was somewhat of a surprise, since only two responses came in from all of our readers asked whether we should cover production and research of the crop, should those matter become interesting to agriculture. You can view these letters in…

    Continue Reading


  • Don McCabe

    State Senators In Nebraska Unicameral Need Your Input

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on February 6, 2014

    What was called the "Nebraska Experiment" in the mid-1930s and ultimately implemented in 1937 remains with us today, 77 years later. The Nebraska Unicameral, a one-house legislature, is the only state legislative structure like it in the nation. For all intense and purposes, a single body of 49 senators is still generally supported across the state. Nebraskans were practical and conservative then, even during an era of new federal programs designed to pull the country out of the…

    Continue Reading


  • Lon Tonneson

    A Fresh Look At Farm Profits

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on February 6, 2014

    Try rearranging the formula for calculating profit and see how it affects your planning for 2014. The profit formula is: Income – Expenses = Profit. Joshua Dukart, a technician with Burleigh County, N.D., Soil Conservation District and a certified holistic management educator, says to rearrange the formula this way: Income - Profit = Expenses Looking at your farm or ranch through this formula gives you control of the amount of profit you desire. It also also gives you a ceiling for…

    Continue Reading


  • Tim White

    In Search Of An Original Ohio Master Farmer

    Buckeye Farm Beat

     by Tim White
     on February 5, 2014

      I get a lot of calls and emails asking about past issues of Ohio Farmer. Someone wants to know if they can get a copy of the 1957 issue that had their grandfather on the cover taken during Auglaize County Farm and City Tour. I no longer have the bound volume issues in the office, so I steer them to the Ohio Historical Society or the Ohio Department of Agriculture or the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Science at Ohio State. Once I got a request from a lady in Arizona…

    Continue Reading


  • Holly Spangler

    The Promise of the Prairie

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on February 5, 2014

    Snow. Wind. Cold. Repeat. It's been a long winter in the Midwest, and it's only February 5. My children are home for yet another snow day. I'd like to say we're crafting and baking and getting along and being kind and good helpers and everything, but you all know if I said that, I'd be sitting on a throne of lies. At best, we are survivors, weathering another snow day and dreaming of planting corn. Outside, the livestock waterers have been frozen and unfrozen. And…

    Continue Reading


  • Fran O

    Sustainable Farming Saved Wisconsin Agriculture

    Badger View

     by Fran O'Leary
     on February 4, 2014

    Countless news releases cross my desk every month talking about sustainable farming practices and sustainable agriculture. Sustainability has become quite the buzz word during the past decade. Many people talk about it, but I'm not sure everyone understands what it is. If you look the word up in the dictionary, you will find that sustainable means "able to be maintained." Sustainable agriculture is defined as "exploiting natural resources without destroying the ecological…

    Continue Reading


  • Willie Vogt

    Farm tractor makers keep inventories under control

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on February 4, 2014

    Final equipment sales/inventory figures reported by the Association of Equipment Manufacturers for 2013 offer a look at another stellar year for machinery sales. Every category rose for the year except four-wheel drive tractor sales - and those only slipped 0.4%. For the whole year, total farm tractor sales came to nearly 202,000 machines and showed a sales rise of 9.1% or the year. Combine sales were up too by 9.8% for the year - including a big jump in December as farmers scrambled to take…

    Continue Reading


  • Curt Arens

    Propane Shortage Worries Farm Users

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on February 4, 2014

    Around our place, we are pretty reliant on propane as a fuel source. We utilize propane for grain drying, as well as heating for our house and barns. With our stove also running on propane, even our evening supper depends on a good supply. We’re not alone. Over 865,000 farms and ranches rely on propane for at least some of their energy needs. This winter has been taxing on all energy supplies, not just propane. You’ll read more details at Nebraska Farmer online and in a future…

    Continue Reading


  • Tom Bechman

    Man, I Sure Love This Cold Weather!

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on February 3, 2014

    I'm known far and wide for hating hot weather. The summer of 2012 was like being in purgatory for me. If the thermometer is above 90 degrees, I find air conditioning or shade. In 2012 when it was 106 degrees at 5 o'clock in the afternoon on my trusty John Deere thermometer in the shade, even the shade didn't help. So I usually say I'll take cold weather anytime over the heat of the dead of the summer. I can put clothes on but I can only take so many clothes off in the summer…

    Continue Reading