• Lon Tonneson

    Brazil -- Day 2

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on January 31, 2011

        I stilll haven't been on a farm in Brazil. But I''m getting closer. I've met a couple farmers. They are with Aprosoja, the organization that represents farmers in state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, like the Illinois Soybean Association represents farmers in the state of Illinois. Over dinner I got in a couple really smart questions to the vice president who had driven in hundreds of miles to be at this meeting. Have you started harvesting soybeans yet?   No, not yet…

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  • Holly Spangler

    The Aftermath of Suzanne

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 31, 2011

    So last week, I posted a blog letter to Suzanne Somers, hoping to shed light on the many agricultural inaccuracies she shared on national television. And you might say, it struck a chord. Oh, did it ever. I am humbled and awed. As of this afternoon, more than 600 people have shared it on Facebook. Other people are sharing it on Twitter. (I am new to tweeting – twittering? – and I don't know how to measure this exactly, but it seems to be happening.) And as for the blog itself…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Where Have All the Farmers Gone?

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on January 31, 2011

    There was a time not so long ago, about 10 years or so, when it was standing room only in a cafeteria that holds 225 people for the annual meeting of the Johnson County Soil and Water Conservation District. Each soil and water district is required to hold an annual meeting during the winter months in the New Year. No two are alike. Always a strong one, it was disappointing to only come up with 75 people at the 2011 Johnson County SWCD meeting a couple weeks ago. And that may have been using…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Brazil - Day 1

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on January 31, 2011

    I made it to Brazil. It was nearly a 24 hour trip from Fargo, N.D., to Sao Paulo. The city is a hot noisy, place and a little bit of a culture shock for me. I'm comfortable with the wide open places of the Cornbelt and small, clean Midwestern towns. In this part of Sao Paulo there is graffiti everywhere. Houses, hotels and offices are surrounded with iron fences and walls. Some of the fences and walls are topped razor wire. There are homeless people sleeping in doorways, in…

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  • Curt Arens

    Why Should Punxsutawney Phil Have All the Fun?

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on January 30, 2011

    Nebraska has its own answer to Groundhog Day.   One summer day when I was home from college, and when my parents still lived on the farm where we live now, I peered out the kitchen window and made an announcement. “Beavers are coming up to the farm from the creek,” I said. It was quite a revelation. We live at least a half mile from West Bow Creek, and there was no reason for any well-minded beaver to search that far away from home for wood. The “beaver” I had…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Do You Think I'll Melt In Brazil?

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on January 28, 2011

    Tomorrow I take off for Brazil. I'm representing Farm Progress Companies on a trip with a delegation from the Illinois Soybean Association. To prepare for the trip I did all the usual things -- packing, making sure I had everything on the list, etc. I also took one last ride on the snowmobile around the farmstead where I live and work outside of Fargo. I promptly buried the the snowmobile in a drift back in the shelterbelt and spent around two hours digging it out. By the time I was done, I…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Dear Suzanne Somers

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 27, 2011

    Dear Ms. Somers, I am writing this letter on a Thursday, having understood through various social media outlets that you appeared on the Today Show a couple times late last week and over the weekend. I used to watch the Today Show faithfully, but then I got tired of being frightened into believing my kids were going to huff something, be kidnapped at birth or be eaten by sharks. For awhile, I tried to catch the headlines during the 7 -7:30 a.m. half hour, just to see what happened in the…

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  • Tim White

    Cattlemen’s Meeting Turns into Ohio Farmer Reunion

    Buckeye Farm Beat

     by Tim White
     on January 27, 2011

    Having never raised cattle, I was not really expecting the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association Annual Meeting to be old home week. I was invited to participate in the evening’s ceremonies to present the Young Cattleman of the Year Award on behalf of Ohio Farmer as a sponsor. When I arrived at the Columbus Marriott Northwest I asked Elizabeth Harsh, executive vice president of the group, to introduce me to the winner Patrick Saunders from Gallipolis. Patrick and I had played some phone…

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  • Josh Flint

    Cultivating Master Farmers Program Seeks Young Farmer Applicants

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on January 27, 2011

    The Cultivating Master Farmers coordinating committee is now accepting young farmer applications for the class of 2013. CMF pairs young farmers with Prairie Farmer Master Farmers for a truly unique mentoring experience. One of my favorite aspects of the program is the inclusion of spouses. I’ve heard many young farmers say the biggest thing they learned from the Master Farmers is how to treat their wife like a business partner. Watching the roundtable discussions, it’s easy…

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  • Curt Arens

    Quiet after the Storm

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on January 26, 2011

    Pure quiet is hard to come by.   Not long ago, the wild winter winds howled all night. It was the storm before the calm. After several new inches of snow, we were blocked in. I crawled into my coveralls early the morning after the storm to plug in my tractor. As I stepped outside into the darkness of the early morning, I noticed that the wind had died down completely. There was no howling wind, no blowing snow, nothing. The new snow crunched under my feet in the frigid pre-dawn air as…

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  • John Vogel

    Be Smart About Smart Phones

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on January 26, 2011

      In last week's blog, I explored the potential for smart phones – next-gen computer-phone hybrids with that can connect with any information source short of God. (Okay, that's a slight overstatement.) The software applications or "apps" hold tremendous potential to boost your productivity. But, as it turns out there are a few more details – okay, more than a few – you should know about. Consider these pointers from Fox 5 Tech Expert Shelly Palmer at WNYW-TV in New…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    OK, It's Cheesy, But I Couldn't Stop Myself; I Got An Autograph

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on January 25, 2011

    I admit it. I'm one of those geeky people who collect autographs. So, today at No-till on the Plains, when I got a chance to meet Steve Wozniak and collect his autograph, I couldn't resist. I stood in line with a couple hundred other people, all clutching something appropriate for autograph and waited my turn to say something to one of the inventors of the computer age as we know it. He was an enormously pleasant man who started the day's discussion with "no time limits for me, let's…

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  • Willie Vogt

    Auction Site Pushes Ag Iron

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on January 25, 2011

    Deal hunters seeking farm equipment have a number of choices these days from dealer-based IronSolutions.com to their local equipment jockey. One player in the used equipment market that's helping move machines globally is IronPlanet.com. For three years now, IronPlanet has had an ag-only auction. This farm-focused event is now drawing up to 17,000 bidders on the Fridays (one per month) it happens. Paul Blalock, vice president, ag equipment for the auction firm, says that about 35% of the…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Give Me a Break!

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 25, 2011

    I wanted to pass along a little video I came across today. And yes, I know it's two months old and yes, I'm just now seeing it. So perhaps you, too, have seen it already. Regardless, I think there are some good points to be made here. First of all, it's John Stossel, the guy I grew up watching on 20/20 because it wasn't a Friday night in the Hinderliter household without 20/20, but apparently now he's on Fox Business. Again, I'm aware I'm behind. See previous paragraph. Anyway. Stossel…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Corn talk

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on January 25, 2011

    I ran down to Sioux Falls from Fargo Saturday for the South Dakota Corn Growers Association convention. Some of interesting things I heard at the conference: Land values boom. I heard about land selling for nearly $4,000 per acre in central South Dakota and $5,000 per acre near northwest Iowa. The land price-to-yield ratio is apparently higher in South Dakota that many other places in the Cornbelt. Cutting back. But not everybody is hungry for more land. One farmer told me…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Sometimes, It's Tough to Be an Illini

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 24, 2011

    In the heat of Saturday's game against Ohio State, I zipped off the following email to my colleague, Tim White, editor of our Ohio Farmer magazine, who once tried to drown me:  From: Holly Spangler Sent: Saturday, January 22, 2011 To: TWhite@farmprogress.com Subject: oh yeah             Now THAT's a game. Take that "the" Ohio State!! This was, I should note, well into the third quarter. Illinois was on fire, they had…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Those Before Us Faced Challenges Too

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on January 24, 2011

    As I sit here and write this today, it occurs to me that my father, George Robert Bechman, a lifelong tenant farmer, a Pearl Harbor Survivor, and my guiding light, even when I didn't know it, died exactly five months ago today, on Aug. 21, 2010. It was about 85 degrees warmer and the grass was brown, not white, but in my mind's eye, it hasn't been that long. Wherever I go I hear people talking about the challenges we face - the deficit, rising input costs, weed resistance, you name it. There…

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  • Curt Arens

    Insuring Agritourism

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on January 21, 2011

      Over the years, our family has hosted visitors on the farm, selling Christmas trees from our tree fields, inviting customers on the farm for open houses and bus tours. Liability insurance for these enterprises was always something we were aware of, even if we weren’t sure if we had enough coverage. In the December issue of Nebraska Farmer, I had the pleasure of visiting Kreycik Riverview Elk and Buffalo Ranch along the Niobrara River. Chris and Kenard Kreycik host about…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    Good News For Ethanol

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on January 21, 2011

    The ethanol industry, which includes Kansas corn and sorghum growers, got a boost today when EPA announced approval of a 15% blend of ethanol for cars 2001 and newer, about 62% of the American passenger fleet. It's a great start to getting more ethanol and less Middle Eastern oil in our fuel supply and to keeping our dollars in America instead of shipping them to Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Now, on to blender pumps, more flex fuel vehicles and E-85 for…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Health Insurance. Bleck.

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 21, 2011

    So, we got the letter this week. No big surprise: our health insurance premium is going up this year. Again. Just like last year. And the year before. Certainly, I shouldn't complain. We're healthy, so we don't have any major medical costs. But here's the thing. We're paying $3,600 a year in premiums for a policy with a $5,200 family deductible. That means we'll pay out $8,800 in a given year before we get any coverage whatsoever. To date, the only time we've ever met our deductible was…

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  • Josh Flint

    What Happened to the Three Rs?

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on January 20, 2011

    Remember the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle ad campaign? It seems like these PSAs started showing up at my school in the 1990s. Despite the campaign’s common sense approach to environmentalism, today folks rarely mention the three Rs. Instead, we’ve substituted them for one word: sustainability. During the Illinois Fertilizer and Chemical Association’s Annual Convention, The Fertilizer Institute’s Laura Moody pointed out that sustainability has three pillars: economic…

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  • Holly Spangler

    What Was Your Best Decision?

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 19, 2011

    Several years ago, I came up with a handful of questions I like to ask Master Farmers. Through their nomination/application process, they submit virtually every shred of information regarding their farming operations, so I try to use the interview to learn a little bit more about them as a person. This isn't rocket science, believe me, but one of the things I like to ask is, "what's the best decision you ever made?" And I will say that nearly every time, often without hesitation, the Master…

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  • John Vogel

    Get A Smarter Phone?

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on January 18, 2011

    We've come a long way from the "ring-em up" party line wall telephone my grandparents had. Now, you can take/make phone calls with a pocket-sized wireless that also can tap the Internet to send/receive e-mail and text messages, upload/download data and more. That's why they're called smartphones. Verizon's recent entry into the iPhone market will hike market competition, eventually reduce costs and greatly boost software or applications available on smart phones. No matter which smartphone…

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  • Willie Vogt

    Engine Questions Abound

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on January 18, 2011

    Judging from some of the questions I got from the Farm Futures Business Management Summit, readers are watching engine developments closely. Of course, engine makers have been tightening down on emissions since 1996, but this latest round and the changes to the engines have your attention. Starting this year, major farm equipment manufacturers have to phase in new interim Tier 4 engines for machinery that's rated at 175 horsepower or higher. But you won't find those engines on every machine…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    Whatever Weather Does, This is Doldrums Time of Year

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on January 17, 2011

    This is the time of winter discontent. Oh, the heck with the winter of OUR. . . discontent and all that other literary stuff. Farmers know that late January and early February is the awful time of the year. Christmas and New Years and shiny resolutions are over. It is a long, long time until spring. So here we are in the sometimes snowy, often cold, ever windy, mostly cloudy, just plain YUCK!! season of the year. And I do have some ideas to offer -- although mind you none of this applies to…

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  • Curt Arens

    In Good Hands

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on January 17, 2011

    Senators and farm leaders work together to raise a strong voice for agriculture.   When Nebraska Farmer editor, Don McCabe developed the idea of surveying farm leaders and legislative veterans around the state about the strength of the voice of agriculture in shaping farm policy, he didn’t know how these folks would answer. With a shrinking rural population in much of the state and with redistricting looming large over this session of the Unicameral, it is a sure bet that…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Ten Reasons I Like This Indiana Winter

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on January 17, 2011

    Just the thought of 90 degree plus days when I have to be outside working makes me break out in a sweat even now. I don't just not like hot days- I loathe them, hate them, detest them- OK, so maybe I could use anger management training. I physically and emotionally can't stand super-hot days. So I promised I wouldn't complain about the winter. Of course I didn't know it was going to be this cold and this snowy for this long. But I still haven't complained, not really. If someone says, "Oh man…

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  • Tim White

    Land Prices Make Good Table Talk

    Buckeye Farm Beat

     by Tim White
     on January 16, 2011

    With 800 farmers from about 30 states gathered in Cincinnati last week for the National No-till Conference, the talk in the main sessions at the Hilton Hotel’s Hall of Mirrors focused on production practices. Look for reports of those discussions in the February issue. However, at the morning breakfast Thursday the farmers gathered at the table I was sitting at were interested in land prices. We had farmers from Colorado and Kansas, Missouri and Indiana and Iowa enjoying a big breakfast…

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  • Josh Flint

    Winter Meetings Yield Important Take-Home Points

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on January 14, 2011

    Tis the season for winter meetings. I hit three meetings/seminars/conferences in one week. Lots of excellent info at each one, but there’s always several tidbits that seem to hang around in your mind, days after the actual meetings are over. It’s just good common sense stuff. Things that maybe you’ve never thought of before. Or, stuff that’s obvious, yet it’s been a while since you considered it. For example, at the Farm Futures Summit in St. Louis, Purdue…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Scared Straight

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on January 12, 2011

    A weed resistance meeting that I attended today reminded me of those Scared Straight programs from junior high – the ones where they take you to the county jail or the state prison and show what your life will be like if don’t follow the rules. Instead of taking us to the county jail, speakers at the Peterson Farms Seed seminar gave us of tour of Mid-South soybean and cotton farms. Instead of seeing an 8- x 8-foot concrete cell with iron bars, we saw soybeans in Arkansas…

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  • Curt Arens

    No Bull

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on January 11, 2011

    The numbers are great, but visual appraisal and common sense go a long way in selecting bulls. Bull sale season is starting to heat up around the state. So we’re sticking with a beef theme in this week’s blog, talking about the most important animal in your herd – the bull. I was visiting with a rancher recently about his criteria for selecting bulls. He told me that before he goes to a bull sale, he looks over all the data available and chooses the bulls that fit into his…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Rural School Research

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 11, 2011

    Things I am learning about school districts in Illinois: 1.  We have a lot of them. 868, to be exact. Iowa has 372, and they'd like to cut it to 144. The state of Delaware has so few that every superintendent can gather in the state superintendent's living room. 2.  This is not all Chicago's fault. There are a lot of districts up there, but there are a whole lot more one-school districts downstate. 3.  We have a lot of areas with "dual districts" where there are separate…

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  • John Vogel

    Farm Bureau's Action Must Be Commended, Supported!

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on January 11, 2011

    For more than a year, American Agriculturist has reported on the rising tide of environmental vindictiveness and fiscal disconnect that permeates the mentality of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency leaders. No agricultural group has had the audacity to challenge EPA's overreaching authority – until this week. American Farm Bureau Federation and Pennsylvania Farm Bureau has filed suit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in federal court in Harrisburg, Pa. The lawsuit…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    It's Snowing, It's Drifting, It's Miserable, But It Really Is Not Moist

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on January 10, 2011

    It is easy to feel miserable with the weather conditions outside; high winds, blowing snow, bitter cold. And the thing that should make it bearable -- at least we're getting badly need moisture -- isn't that comforting, considering that this light, powdery, dry snow doesn't have much moisture content. In fact, the four inches that has fallen in the Wichita area is projected to have added a paltry .25 inches to our rain profile. Temperatures on Tuesday night are expected to drop below…

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  • Willie Vogt

    Where Competition Counts

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on January 10, 2011

    Buyer loyalty is important and the major farm equipment companies also know it's earned. They invest in dealerships, technology and new equipment and innovations, but the majors are not alone. In fact, there are a host of smaller, fast-moving firms that want a piece of the action too and based on the survey we conducted late in 2010, there are some inroads they can make. Spraying equipment is a point of contention in the market. That's due in part to the fact that there are several non-major…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Caught In A Time Warp

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on January 10, 2011

    The wallpaper border around the top of my office walls is a bucolic scene of Holstein cows in the pasture. My late father milked for 20 years, during my 'formative years' and I think happy thoughts when I see those cows, even though there was a lot of hard work involved. It seemed like a simpler time. You knew what work had to be done, you did it, and then you went on to the next job. The shelves above and to the side of me hold farm toys- everything from a red Tru-Scale picker on a John Deere…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    No Bones About It

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on January 10, 2011

      South Dakota sure has had a good run of ag secretaries. Larry Gabriel – the West River rancher and longtime state lawmaker– was great. He really helped grow the livestock industry, especially dairy. Bill Even – the southeast South Dakota corn and bean farmer – did a fine job. When Even resigned to take a job with Pioneer, Deputy Secretary Jon Farris was appointed to fill out the term. He would have made a good secretary in his own right. Walt Bones is…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    You Hear About Dry, But Until You See It, You Don't Get It

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on January 7, 2011

    I drove out to Stafford County today for the first of my six interviews with this year's Master Farmer/Master Farm Homemaker Award stories and on the return trip, I got a reminder that this has been an extraordinarily dry fall and winter in central Kansas. Just west of Hutchinson, I had to pull off to the side of the road as gusty northwest winds picked up the topsoil from fields and hurled them across the road, temporarily cutting visibility to near zero. DUSTY DAY: Blowing dirt…

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  • Tim White

    The Aroma of Cover Crops

    Buckeye Farm Beat

     by Tim White
     on January 7, 2011

    Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Recovery

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 7, 2011

    I mentioned last week that our New Year's Eve plans included lots of teenagers and very little sleep. Oh, did it ever. In some fit of excitement late last fall, we decided to invite our high school youth group over to spend the night on New Year's Eve. They put together a little coffee house that night at church, which involved them serving and entertaining, then we returned to our house for the big sleepover. And pizza. You can't have a youth group sleepover without pizza. A few…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    It's Hard To Believe Snow Is On The Way

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on January 6, 2011

    It's been a strange December, vacillating between incredibly warm and blustery cold with nary a drop of moisture in sight, the 10th driest December on record, the weather gurus say. But now, there is snow in the forecast for Sunday and Monday, with up to 6 inches expected to accumulate on the ground as a winter storm moves through. It seems incredible today, with sunny skies a high pushing 60, but single digit cold and sub-zero windchills are expected to hit over the weekend. The mere…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Girl Scout Cookies: Now HFCS-Free?

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 6, 2011

    The Girl Scouts of America have taken heat for a lot of things regarding their scrumptious little cookies. First, that they’re full of fat and calories, that they’re bad for people, that they encourage little girls to peddle unhealthy products. Now I love a Thin Mint as much as the next person, but obviously, the word moderation should come into play here. As my sister-in-law wisely says, “One Krispy Kreme won’t make you fat. Six will.” Anyway. Last summer…

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  • Josh Flint

    My Generation Doesn't Want to Grow Up

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on January 5, 2011

    A few weeks ago, a friend and I were having a thought-provoking conversation about the dreams and ambitions of our generation. He said something profound when he mentioned, “Josh, our generation just wants stuff. They don’t care about furthering their career or being the best at what they do. They just want a new iPhone or Xbox game." As I pondered this comment, I realized he’s right. It’s a sad state of affairs, but too many young folks do not have a 5- or 10-year…

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  • John Vogel

    Got 'Gold Fever'? Get Vaccinated!

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on January 4, 2011

    You've no doubt seen those television advertisements touting gold as a get-rich-quick investment. Well, it is a get-rich-quick proposition – for the seller! The gold coin "sales pitchers" say it's worth its weight in gold. Well, yes. In fact, it always has been. But as Cornell Ag Economist William Schulze noted recently at Cornell's Agribusiness Outlook Conference, today's gold prices are trading on fear induced by the global economic recession. Would he buy gold today? "Certainly…

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  • Curt Arens

    A Cow's Job Description

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on January 4, 2011

    If my cows are my employees, do I have to negotiate benefits?     I enjoyed listening to acclaimed grazing consultant, researcher and author, Jim Gerrish, when he stopped in O’Neill recently, courtesy of University of Nebraska Extension and the Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition. One of the most interesting points made by Gerrish was that our cows should be viewed as employees. So, we should think of a job description for them and understand in detail what we want our…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Redneck Sledding

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on January 4, 2011

    Check out this merry band of sledders! Slightly frozen, very snowy, and soon to be very sore. They are, give or take, most of the aunts, uncles and cousins on my husband's side. Also, see that big round thing in the middle? The thing that resembles the top of a poly tank?  Technically, it was the top of a poly tank. Then it became a giant sled. And it's amazing. I should also add, it may not look like an instrument of torture, but my sister-in-law's arm tells a different story…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Answering Phone is Like Playing Russian Roulette

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on January 3, 2011

    The land line office phone for Indiana Prairie Farmer doesn't get the workout it once did, what with much business transacted by email. But it's still the official way to reach us. Some days it rings more often than others. What's certain is I'm never sure what will be on the other end of the line. Since I work out of my home, and our grandson, a one-year-old lives with us, I usually hesitate long enough to listen for background sounds, like him cooing or crying, before I decide it's Carla…

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  • Willie Vogt

    Survey Yields Interesting Responses

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on January 1, 2011

    In the brand loyalty survey we conducted in partnership with the dealer publication Farm Equipment we learned that brand loyalty (featured in January installment of Farmer Iron in your favorite Farm Progress publication), on the whole, is staying pretty strong. There are some market segments where you may be more likely to shop outside your favorite color - planters and tillage are two - but on the whole a majority of respondents to the survey say they stick with one color. We did build some…

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