• Rod Swoboda

    Iowan Norman Borlaug To Be Enshrined In U.S. Capitol

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on March 14, 2014

    Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad will join a group of Iowans on March 25 in Washington, D.C. for the official unveiling of the Norman Borlaug sculpture in Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol. "We'll have the entire Iowa Congressional delegation present along with students, teachers, business leaders and others," says World Food Prize Foundation President Kenneth Quinn, who appeared with Branstad at a recent press conference at the State Capitol in Des Moines to make the announcement. The…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Top 10 Facts About Biotech Crops

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on March 12, 2014

    Occasionally, tidbits of info cross my desk and I think to myself: well, there's something to save. Like this list. It's a roundup of the top 10 facts about biotech crops, as reported in a new article by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications, a very reliable international group that's tracked biotech crops for years. Sidenote: are you on Pinterest? In the last few months, I've started a Pinterest board to keep track of some of these bits of…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Your Comments Are Wanted On New GMO Seeds

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on February 28, 2014

    USDA on February 24, 2014 announced it is extending the public comment period until March 11 on whether to allow the sale of corn and soybean seeds that are part of a new weed control system from Dow AgroSciences. The new seeds are genetically engineered to resist both glyphosate herbicide and 2,4-D. Officials of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service say the extension is provided in response to stakeholder requests for additional time to gather public input. In early January…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Amazing History Of Food And Farming

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on February 21, 2014

    Students and adults alike will enjoy exploring the impressive new educational exhibits at the World Food Prize Foundation Hall of Laureates in downtown Des Moines. Thoughtful and well-planned, the Educational Exhibits Wing rivals what you would expect at the Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C. The interactive exhibits are a fun, interesting way to learn about the history of food and agriculture, about famous Iowans and to gain a better understanding of the global challenges related to…

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  • John Vogel

    May anti-GMOers choke on a ‘Phil Robertson’

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on January 21, 2014

    I'm continually perplexed by the tunnel vision and "my way or no way" attitude of socio-politico activist groups – anti-frackers, anti-GMOers, anti-gunners, anti-food animals, and more. They've gained power and influence, at least in part, due to a generally clueless, gullible populace who'll believe just about anything posted on the Web. The antis are no different than the self-righteous who attacked Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson for his personal viewpoint…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Don't Miss "40 Chances" Photo Exhibit

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on January 10, 2014

    Over the course of their working lives, most farmers get about 40 growing seasons or 40 chances to improve upon every harvest. Actually, that's true for most everyone -- each of us gets about 40 chances to accomplish our goals in life. The World Food Prize Foundation, headquartered in Des Moines, is hosting a photo exhibit titled "40 Chances, Finding Hope In A Hungry World". Open to the public with free admission, the exhibit features a collection of 120 photos by Howard G…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Seed Trait Approval Slowdown

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on December 5, 2013

    I heard an interesting discussion the other day at the Northern Ag Expo in Fargo, N.D., about how new seed traits aren’t getting approved as fast as they used to. It used to take 1-2 years to get new an okay to sell new seed traits. Now it takes 3-4 years to win approval, according to Keith Peltier, of ProSeed, and Carl Peterson, of Peterson Farms Seed. Both men are owners and general managers of regional seed companies based on North Dakota. Peltier and Peterson blamed the delay partly…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Five Things about GMOs

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on November 26, 2013

    Five resources for when you hear… 1. GMOs cause tumors. In rats. Special French rats. You know, I can see what this one has gotten traction. Rats with super giant GM-fueled tumors growing from their heads? Those are the kinds of phrases activists dream of. But even other French scientists couldn't get on board with it. The New York Times reported last year that France's six scientific academies issued a "rare joint statement" dismissing the rat study. The leader of the…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    The Great Debate On GMO Crops

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on November 4, 2013

    Iowa farmer Bill Horan's prediction about biotechnology drew jeers from the anti-GMO people in the audience at a debate a couple weeks ago in Des Moines. Horan said he believes two decades from now, every livestock animal and crop used to feed the world's increasing population will be genetically enhanced. He added, "People will look back 20 years from now, and say, "Gosh, what was all the fuss about?" An overflow crowd of 250-plus listened to Horan and five others…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Biological Barcodes Could Track Food Back To The Farm

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on November 2, 2013

    File this under “gee-whiz technology that might be coming soon.” Or maybe file it under “if you didn’t like premise identification, you’re going to hate this.” An Ohio based company says it is developing a biological barcode that would be injected into or onto produce so that food safety officials can tell what farm it comes from. The technology has its roots biological barcodes. Not long ago, scientists discovered that the bacteria, fungi and other…

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