• Tom Bechman

    Dirt in My Billfold Tells the Story

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on September 30, 2013

    When you pull out your billfold to pay for a Polar Pop at the local gas station and particles of soil fall out, plus maybe a wisp of a corn stalk leaf, brown and golden, it could be quite embarrassing. Actually, I’m proud of what I do and it’s an occupational hazard. If someone that sees the soil fall out and the corn leaf segment drift to the floor thinks I’m a hick, so be it. The soil gets there largely because I volunteer to coach local soil judging teams, and…

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  • Holly Spangler

    CAFO: "The Auschwitz of Livestock?"

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on September 30, 2013

    It wasn't exactly what we expected to hear at a farm tour sponsored by the Illinois Farm Families program. What we expected when George Kalogridis, an Indiana-based organic certification manager, stepped in front of the crowd of Chicago Field Moms and downstate (cattle raising) farm moms a couple weekends ago during our tour of the Larson/Martz grain and cattle operation, was a few details on what's allowed and not allowed on certified organic farms. Maybe a little on the types…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Investment Opportunity

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 28, 2013

    Northern Plains Nitrogen is now offering farmers and others the opportunity to invest directly in the proposed $1.7 billion fertilizer manufacturing plant to be located in Grand Forks, N.D. The plant, which organizers hope will begin operation in 2017, will make fertilizer out of natural gas. “We are very excited to announce that farmers, and others have the opportunity to invest directly in this project,” says Darin Anderson, chairman of Northern Plains Nitrogen board of…

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  • Curt Arens

    Families Growing Our Food: Managed Grazing Includes Best Land Use

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on September 27, 2013

    Curt’s Comments:  Riding around in Don Peregrine’s pickup through his pastures near Fullerton, you can hear Don’s love of the land, and his understanding about how different types of land need to be handled differently. On his farm, he has low land along a river and upland Sandhills pastures. He knows that these unique properties need to be grazed in customized ways to get the most from land, but also to protect it. Here is his story… A “grazing…

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  • Josh Flint

    An Ode to Old Cars

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on September 26, 2013

    There are two types of older cars. You’ve got your “seasoned” car that keeps running despite a few extra squeaks and rattles. Then, you have your bucket of bolts that necessitates you keep a tool handy for a quick daily tweak. Unfortunately, my 2006 Nissan Sentra, with 144,000 miles, slid into the second category last week. It’s not quite as bad as some I’ve seen, i.e. I’m not driving around with a pair of vise grips in lieu of a steering…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    This Seed Ad May Make You Laugh

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 26, 2013

    Tired of all those serious seed ads that are running everywhere this time of year? An ad from Millborn Seeds, Brookings, S.D., will make you laugh. The company sells forage, grass and cover crop seeds. The commercial is a spoof. They were just having fun when they dreamed up, “Milton Tarkenton’s Super Mega Sugar Beet Seed Warehouse Store.” They thought their customers would enjoy the fake commercial. I did and it made me want to buy their seeds! Check it…

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  • Tim White

    Ag Dean Makes Ohio Farm Science Scene

    Buckeye Farm Beat

     by Tim White
     on September 25, 2013

      For me setup day at Farm Science Review is the Sunday before the show starts. The first thing I need is a key to the Ohio Farmer building. And the first person I saw when I went to show headquarters to get that key was Bruce McPheron, vice president of agricultural administration and dean of the college of Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Science. “It’s going to be a great show,” the Dean predicted. “Just look around this place. What a perfect…

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  • T.J. Burnham

    Washington Wine Science Center Poised As Pivotal Facility

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on September 24, 2013

    In what has become a Pacific Coast wine industry project, Washington State University’s new Wine Science Center, which broke ground last week in Richland, has caught the eye even of those crafty California viticulture/enology interests. A decision by the Boswell Family Foundation to donate $250,000 to the effort brings California into the project with the money funded on behalf of Boswell barrel production firms. This makes the project far more than a simple Washington concept…

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  • Paula Mohr

    Cooler Temps Bring Out The Baker

    Northstar Notes

     by Paula Mohr
     on September 24, 2013

    Cooler temperatures signal that little voice inside my head, telling me it's time to preheat the oven and make some cookies. Or, a pie. Or, some sort of dessert. That's what happened to me last week. Out of the blue one evening, I was measuring flour, sugar and other ingredients to make oatmeal cookies with dried cranberries. My husband was doing some work in the basement, heard the mixer running and came up to confirm what he thought I might be doing. Before descending again, he…

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  • Curt Arens

    The Difference Between a Weed and a Crop

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on September 24, 2013

    Weeds serve a purpose. I know, there isn’t a farmer out there who really believes that, but they do. They are nature’s way of holding nutrients and soil in place in the absence of other plants that are perhaps more desirable. In conducting research on the history of several modern crops for an article that ran in the Husker Harvest Days program this fall, I learned that many of our current commodity crops started out being considered weeds. That includes oats, which was…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Biotech Firm Opens "New Frontiers" In Iowa

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on September 23, 2013

    An Iowa-based agriculture and biotechnology company, Kemin Industries, recently opened its new $16.7 million research and development center in southeast Des Moines. The new facility will allow the 60 employees who work in the building to reach "new frontiers in science" previously unavailable to the company. The science from the lab will drive development of new products and new generations of existing products. Kemin makes specialty ingredients for a number of products…

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  • Josh Flint

    The Hottest Thing in Ag Tech Right Now

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on September 23, 2013

    They're popping up at farm shows and field days across the Corn Belt. Farmers have been seen gathering around product demonstrations murming excitedly. Occasionally, I'll run into someone who will say, "Hey, did you see it? Man, that thing was really cool." Shoot, even the Today Show had a segment on them a few weeks back. Drones have certainly captured the imagination of farmers and techies alike. Is it the idea flying something without actually being in danger of…

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  • John Vogel

    Even A Farmer Can Need To 'Smartphone Detox'

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on September 23, 2013

    I'm all for having alcoholics and drug addicts coming to church on Sunday, anytime for that matter. And I'll do my best to make sure they feel comfortable with the rest of us "sinners." After all, there's no more powerful assistance for kicking an addictive habit than divine help. But last Sunday morning, I was confronted by another form of addiction. In the middle of the church service, a young couple strolled up the isle in jeans, cowboy boots and belt buckles to…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Heck No, GMO!

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on September 23, 2013

    Hands down, this is the best story I've heard in a long time. Some of our farmer friends took a vacation out east this summer and part of their trip included a jaunt through Boston. Somewhere in that city, on a lovely summer afternoon, they came across a stand set up by Stonyfield Organic and offering up free yogurt. They thought, "Hey, free yogurt. Our kids love yogurt." As they approached, the plot thickened. The Stonyfield folks had placards that read, "Heck…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Lights and SMV Emblems Alone Don't Stop Fatalities

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on September 23, 2013

    For the second time in two years, a car collided with a combine at an intersection, resulting in a fatality. Last year it happened in Tippecanoe County. Three people in the car, including two teenagers, died. This year it happened in Huntington County. The driver of the car that hit the combine was killed. It's up to the courts and law enforcement to assign blame and figure out who did what. But the fact remains, too many accidents with farm-related equipment are happening on rural…

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  • Tyler Harris

    Irrigation Through The Years

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on September 20, 2013

    After two farm shows within a week of one another, I'm finally starting to get caught up on everything from the Farm Progress Show and Husker Harvest Days. Being in central Nebraska, Husker gives a closer look at the irrigation side, including everything from central pivots to subsurface drip irrigation, which has found a place in the Midwest in recent years due to its efficiency in water use – it's common knowledge by now that the water level of the Ogallala Aquifer, which…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Turn Sugar Into Ethanol? You bet!

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 20, 2013

    Should the U.S. start making ethanol out of sugar? I say, you bet. We have a glut of sugar on the market -- thanks mostly to Mexico dumping their surplus into the U.S. this year. Switching to sugar might be good for ag’s image, too. I doubt that anybody will complain about using sugar to make fuel, like they complain about using corn. The food police -- who seem to hate the fact that we use corn to make meat -- aren’t sweet on sugar. They say sugar is making us fat…

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  • John Vogel

    Anti-GMOers Aim To Kill Food Abundance With GMO Labeling

    Nor' east Thinkin'

     by John Vogel
     on September 20, 2013

    Working at a fair booth, I struck up a friendly conversation with Sharon in a neighboring booth. She was marketing "natural" foods. Somehow, the conversation became more adversarial when we hit on the topic of (horrors of) genetically-modified organisms in foods and the need for GMO labeling. If you've read my columns, you already know what I think about the topic. I mentioned there's not one shred of evidence that genetically-engineered products are unsafe. Sharon…

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  • Don McCabe

    There Is Much More To HHD Than Field Demos

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on September 19, 2013

    Some things never change. Take Husker Harvest Days for instance. I've been to every one of the 36 shows so far at the permanent site west of Grand Island and this year's event was one of the best. It's always a great venue for me to interact with Nebraska Farmer readers and to learn about new technologies and farm tools. And it's a great way to catch up on what the state's farm organizations are up to. And the weather at HHD consistently throws a surprise or two…

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  • Holly Spangler

    All the Weather, All the Time

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on September 19, 2013

    Among the folks I got to meet up with at the Farm Progress Show included a long-delayed meeting with Jeff Hamlin, of the Climate Corporation. I've known Jeff for some time, having covered Climate Corp's weather insurance for the past couple years, and Jeff and I had been trying to get together this summer so he could introduce me to their remote weather monitoring system. It was, in a word, cool. And worth the time and the wait. But that's eight words. Some history…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Beef Is What's For Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 18, 2013

    If you like eating beef, there’s a restaurant in South Dakota that you should make a point of visiting. D&K Outpost, of Highmore, S.D., was recently recognized by the South Dakota Beef Industry Council with its Prime Promoters award. Owned and managed by Karen and Greg Swenson, D&K Outpost is best known for its prime rib entrée. In 2012, the restaurant sold approximately 3,600 pounds of ribeye, which is used for both the prime rib and ribeye steaks. It also…

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  • T.J. Burnham

    Who Waits For Their Birthday Anyway! Part II

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on September 18, 2013

    It was me smiling last weekend in my little house on the wheelies. Yes, my first cruise with our new camper trailer went swimmingly, a suggestion of rain that did come with claps of thunder and flashes of light. But in the camper, the rain was no threat as we sat there and looked out  at tent campers with contempt and sarcastic grins. There, only a couple of weeks earlier, stood me in the rain cursing my leaky Coleman. For we have moved up a notch from tent trash to trailer…

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  • Curt Arens

    Husker Harvest Days 2013: Four Things I Learned in Three Days

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on September 17, 2013

    Another year of Husker Harvest Days is down. The show had the usual variances in weather conditions, huge crowds, good folks, useful information and connections being made between producers and the businesses that serve them. All in all, it was a great learning experience, as always, for everyone involved. I know that I came home with a few useful tidbits from the show, some new things that I didn’t know before. 1) If you have any interest in irrigation in the U.S., you need to…

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  • Willie Vogt

    Rethinking Fueling Options

    Farmer Iron

     by Willie Vogt
     on September 16, 2013

    The folks at the Propane Education and Research Council, the checkoff fund for propane producers, are constantly looking for new ways to put propane to work. The low-cost fuel is a byproduct of natural gas production and the supply is abundant these days, which also means prices are lower than for some fuels. Irrigators and users of stationary engines already have a range of power sources to choose from. We ran into Origin Engines at Husker Harvest days, where they were showing off their…

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  • Jennifer Vincent

    'I Do' -- Rain Or Shine

    Michigan Musings

     by Jennifer Vincent
     on September 16, 2013

    I'm going to deviate from my normally ag-focused rambling to share a bit of my personal life. If you haven't already noticed – I have a new last name. On a perfect, not-too-hot day, July20, I married my best friend of the last 2 ½ years, Christopher Kiel. The outdoor wedding and reception was held at our best friend's mother's pond surrounded by beautiful woods. The afternoon wedding was preluded with gorgeous, sunny skies and a weather forecast of the same…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Water Rocks! Ready To Inspire Kids Across Iowa

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on September 16, 2013

    What do rubber ducks, dogs, pirates, poop and poodle skirts have in common? These are all tools being used to promote a new statewide awareness campaign called "Water Rocks!" At the recent annual meeting of the Soil and Water Conservation Districts of Iowa, held in Des Moines, I and a couple hundred other people had the opportunity to hear a presentation by Jacqueline Comito, director of the campaign. She explained the Water Rocks! project and showed several of the videos she and…

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  • Tom Bechman

    Farmers Await Harvest With Lots of Questions

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on September 16, 2013

    Arguing this growing season didn't have two distinct halves would be tough. It started out cool and wet – wet enough to delay planting or at least push it back beyond where most people like to start. Then it brought rain in June, too much in some places, just enough in others. July was cool overall with adequate rain in many places. Here comes the split personality. It went from a cool and wet trend to a hot and dry trend just in time to burst the bubble of those dreaming of…

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  • Fran O

    State Fair Was a Record-Breaking Success

    Badger View

     by Fran O'Leary
     on September 12, 2013

    Ideal weather with mild temperatures, low humidity and very little rain no doubt helped boost attendance at the 2013 Wisconsin State Fair, but diverse ag and educational exhibits, big-name entertainment, great carnival rides and a wide variety of food were the main reasons the 2013 Wisconsin State Fair tied an attendance record that dates back to 1969. More than 1 million people – 1,012,552 to be exact – attended the 11-day fair from Aug. 1-11 in West Allis. That's…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    King Corn's Secrets To High Yields

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 12, 2013

    What’s Randy Dowdy’s secret to high corn yields? Dowdy won the irrigated division in the 2012 National Corn Growers Yield Contest with a 372-bushel-per-acre entry. He shared some of his secrets to high yields at a session at the recent Big Iron farm show in West Fargo, N.D. “The most important thing to see in your field…is your shadow,” said Dowdy, of Valdosta, Ga. He walks every acre of corn on his farm. “I walk with the crop…

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  • Curt Arens

    Husker Harvest Days 2013: Five Things You Won't Want to Miss

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on September 10, 2013

    Over the next three days in Grand Island, farmers and ranchers from across the region will descend on the Husker Harvest Days grounds for the 36th annual celebration of agriculture on the Plains. There are literally thousands of things to see and do at HHD. Here are five of my favorites.  1. Field demonstrations galore. What do you want to see? Combining, haying, tillage, antique plowing, lawn mowing and much more. You can see the newest and the biggest in the fields doing their…

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  • Mindy Ward

    Farm Show Revealed

    Show-Me Life

     by Mindy Ward
     on September 10, 2013

    Attending the Farm Progress Show I expect to see large machinery, new technology and impressive displays. However, this year I set out to find the story behind some of the latest products on the market. What I found were ag companies that look beyond the retail sale, companies that are looking to support their employees and give back to their communities. Golden intentions A gold feed wagon drew my attention to the display of S.I. Feeders, a division of Schoessow, Inc. The typical…

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  • Curt Arens

    Day One of Husker Harvest Days: Hot Day. Cool Stuff.

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on September 10, 2013

    It may have been a warm afternoon in Grand Island at Husker Harvest Days on Tuesday, not only because of the weather, but also because of the interesting and exciting demonstrations, tons of new products and exhibits heating things up. Dr. Joe Jeffrey related stories about the first live cattle-handling demonstrations 25 years ago, when they were still developing the demos and working on a system to best display and demonstrate the chutes. He had Husker Harvest Days crowds in stitches…

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  • Josh Flint

    Are Biopesticides the Future of Crop Protection?

    Prairie Gleanings

     by Josh Flint
     on September 10, 2013

    If I were a betting man (and, I’m not, by the way), I’d wager ag biologicals will explode in the crop protection market in the coming years. What are ag biologicals, or biopesticides? Well, many of you are probably already using them. The VOTiVO portion of Bayer’s Poncho/VOTiVO seed treatment is a biopesticide. More specifically, VOTiVO is a beneficial bacteria that acts as a nematicide. In a broader sense, Bayer’s Dennis Warkentin explains biopesticides…

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  • T.J. Burnham

    Who Waits for Their Birthday Anyway?

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on September 10, 2013

    Hey, I just spent a whole slug of money on a honey of a new camper trailer. As I hurry to construct a place to park it next my garage I am apprehensive about the upcoming course in "Camper Trailers 101" which the dealer will conduct on the day we pick up our little home on wheels. Why, you might ask, would I spend lotsa bucks on a camper trailer? Well, I answer you: because I had to do something to add a little ginger and snap to our lives. Spending money is always good…

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  • Jessica Lavicky

    On The Road Again - Headed West!

    The Daily Dig

     by Jessica Lavicky
     on September 9, 2013

    It's that time of year again where my coworkers hardly see me in the office and where I spend more time living out of a suitcase and walking from one farm show to the next. Okay, I can't literally walk from one show to the other, but if sure feels like it. June started off with the prelim Hay Expo in Waukon, Iowa. That was the first test of the year to get me ready for the months ahead. Somewhere between the Hay Show and today I lost a few days. 67 to be exact. I was just…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Heat, Dryness Take Toll On Soybean Crop

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on September 9, 2013

    In last week's blog we asked "Will Your Corn Beat the Frost?" This week we look at how Iowa's soybean crop is doing, especially the late planted beans. Wayne Fredericks is secretary of the Iowa Soybean Association, farming near Osage in northern Iowa, near the Minnesota border, about 30 miles east of Mason City. His area of the state has a lot of late-planted, late maturing beans this year. Many acres didn't even get planted, as spring was so wet. How do the…

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  • Frank Holdmeyer

    Old Tractors Never Die

    The Bigger Picture

     by Frank Holdmeyer
     on September 9, 2013

      My wife's grandfather bought a new John Deere A tractor in 1951. We still have that tractor and it runs well.  I've always loved those old "two-lungers." In fact, I 'cut my teeth' on my grandfather's 1939 John Deere B mowing pastures with a sickle mower. My son and his family recently attended a parade as part of steam engine days in Mabel, Minn.  "A straight hour of old tractors going by!  Papa would have loved it! I took some…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    $3.25 Corn? Soybeans Under $10?

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 9, 2013

    Corn at $3.25 per bushel. Soybeans under $10 per bushel. Land prices down 5% to 35%. Those figures from Dan Basse, an analyst with AgResource Co., Chicago, Ill., got my attention. So did his phrases like “big changes are rocking agriculture” and “a new kind of farm crisis like back in the mid-1980s.” He did have some good news, too. He said livestock producers will soon have “their turn” at good times. And gas prices are going to fall…

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  • Holly Spangler

    Weekend Wrap-Up: 10 Farm Things

    My Generation

     by Holly Spangler
     on September 9, 2013

    1. My little family attended Salute to Ag Day at the University of Illinois football game this weekend. The game was great, if a little toasty, but the College of ACES tailgate was the best. Good people. Good times. 2. Friday night, my niece, Kaity, and I attended the ACES College Connection event, where they handed out various awards. Among them: the ACES Family Spirit award, which went to the Wright family. They were a farm family of 10 boys in the early part of the century, and sent…

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  • Paula Mohr

    Educating Non-Farming Folks, One At A Time

    Northstar Notes

     by Paula Mohr
     on September 6, 2013

    There was an interesting column in the Sunday Minneapolis Star Tribune by Dennis Anderson entitled "Raising crops and awareness." The outdoors columnist attended a Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council-sponsored farm visit that was held on Spring Creek Farms near North Branch. Owners John and Jewell Peterson are currently involved with Discovery Farms Minnesota. The farm encompasses 700 acres of corn and 700 acres of soybeans, with a small acreage of locally sold…

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  • T.J. Burnham

    Of Pickup Dogs, Getting A Phone And Combo Stoves

    Western Ag Vignettes

     by T.J. Burnham
     on September 6, 2013

    When I see a mutt riding in the back of a Ram with its head hanging over the side, ears flopping in the wind, and squinting down the road, I think of Butch. He was my doggie as a kid, and as my first four-legged buddy, he lives in exaggerated infamy in my ever-embellishing memory. While Butch was just a rat terrier, actually with three legs, who really didn't like me much, I tell my grandchildren of this wonder dog who helped me wander through the fertile fields of youth. Why we…

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  • Don McCabe

    In The Numbers Game, Nebraska Scores Big Time

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on September 6, 2013

    I'm no numbers whiz, but I do find it fun to get caught up in numbers and rankings. To me, baseball is fascinating not only because I love the game but also because there is no end to the statistical possibilities—as in, "What left-handed pitcher, during the ninth inning of playoff games, leads the American League in walks?" No, I don't have the answer. It's just an example. I've read of national rankings that can get downright silly and subjective like…

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  • Curt Arens

    Families Growing Our Food: Melons and More for Helgoth Family

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on September 6, 2013

    Curt’s Comments:  A couple of years ago, I stopped by the Helgoth farm near St. Libory for an interview. It was spring and they had just been hit at the farm by a hail storm. They had to replant thousands of tomatoes, and worried about how well their crops would do. But this is nothing new for this family. They’ve been farming for decades, and have taken their wealth of knowledge to produce high quality food for their loyal customers, and for area school children as…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    CRP Conversion Alone Isn't To Blame For Pheasant Decline

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 5, 2013

    South Dakota pheasant numbers are down, but farmers aren’t completely to blame. That’s what I conclude from reports about South Dakota Game Fish and Game Parks Department's annual roadside survey of pheasants. GF&P cited the decline in habitat -- the conversion of CRP and grassland to cropland -- as one of the reasons behind the drop in the index of pheasants per mile from 4.19 last year to 1.52 this year. But the GF&P says “months of persistent…

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  • Curt Arens

    4-H/FFA: Reaching Out to Our Urban and Farm Youth

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on September 3, 2013

    I just returned yesterday from a great day at the State Fair. As always, I enjoyed the food, agricultural displays, the food, livestock, entertainment, the food, and all of Nebraska on display. Did I mention the food? Anyway, after being involved in the writing of the 4-H articles that appear along with Don McCabe’s FFA stories as part of a youth package on pages 7 and 8 of your September issue of Nebraska Farmer, it occurs to me that these organizations probably get the best press…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Will Your Corn Beat The Frost?

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on September 3, 2013

    Hotter than normal weather the last half of August added heat units to Iowa's late-planted, slow-growing 2013 corn crop. The crop had been lagging in development all summer. The recent blast of heat helped speed up crop maturity somewhat. But many Iowa fields still need more time to develop the crop. Iowa needs a later-than-normal frost this fall. In a nutshell, that's what Iowa State University Extension corn agronomist Roger Elmore told the crowd attending a field day August…

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  • Tyler Harris

    Precision Farming Data Going To The Cloud

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on September 3, 2013

    After a busy, but fun week at the 2013 Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Illinois, I'm now getting caught up on the huge list of new products at this year's show. One thing that stood out is how advancements in technology apply to modern farming. The big thing I've been hearing about is the cloud – a venue now being used to manage precision data. Nearly all of the precision data exhibits I visited had recently unveiled a new program to send data files directly from…

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  • Tom Bechman

    2013 Farm Progress Show Went From Hot to Sizzling

    Hoosier Perspectives

     by Tom Bechman
     on September 2, 2013

    If you stayed away from the 2013 Farm Progress Show because it was hot, you missed a lot of great products. Exhibitors once again saved several of their latest products to introduce at the show. Others brought things they weren't even willing to talk about yet. The most talked about item at the show was an amphibious manure lagoon pump made by the young engineer and son of the company president of Nuhn Manufacturing. He worked on it right up to the show so it hasn't been tested…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    S.D. Farmers Ask HSUS To Drop Horse Processing Injunction

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 2, 2013

    Are Frank Kloucek and Bob Mack tilting at windmills? The two South Dakota farmers recently met with the Humane Society of the United States President and CEO Wayne Pacelle and Vice President Joe Maxell at the Organization of Competitive Markets annual conference in Kansas City, Mo., and asked them to drop their opposition to humane horse processing in the U.S. Following the meeting with HSUS, Kloucek -- a former state legislator from Scotland, S.D., who is running for the State…

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  • Don McCabe

    Sandhills: Land Of The Yellow

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on September 1, 2013

    A jaunt through the Nebraska Sandhills is always a highlight of my travels in Nebraska. As most Nebraskans know, this mixed grass prairie covering nearly one-fourth of the state presents a unique landscape of undulating grass-covered dunes, consistently flowing streams and some of the best grazing in the world. Windmills and cattle dot the ridges, dunes and meadows. I've heard numerous times of people, particularly in spring and early summer, who say they've never seen the…

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  • Mindy Ward

    Show Ring Sportsmanship

    Show-Me Life

     by Mindy Ward
     on September 1, 2013

    As the judges selects the class winner at the Missouri State Fair Swine Show, one-by-one young exhibitors leave their hog behind and make their way across the show ring to congratulate the winner. I would never have caught the gesture had the image not appeared in my camera lens. Often I am focused on the cute little girl and her pig, or the young man driving his hog. Many times, I am just trying to see how well individuals did that I know. But there was something during this year's…

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