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Vertical Tillage
Firsthand look at vertical tillage

The hot term in tillage is vertical tillage. Ironically, those who buy vertical tillage tools are generally practicing no-till or reduced tillage.

Will VT cure what ails you?

In the ag world, vertical tillage is hot. If it were Hollywood, this up-and-coming piece of iron would be akin to the latest power couple’s forbidden romance. Everyone is talking about it.

Retrofit kit saves a bundle on vertical tillage system

Four years ago, Neil Skiles noticed he had a problem. The Industry farmer was running a ripper in the fall, followed by a field cultivator in the spring.

Residue management begins in fall

With higher yield goals, higher plant populations and aggressive fertilization, growers need to manage increased amounts of crop residue to establish productive stands the following year.

V-till debate rages

In the ag world, vertical tillage is hot. If it were Hollywood, this up-and-coming hunk of iron would be akin to gossip on the latest power couple’s forbidden romance. And Pennsylvania’s Carl Shaffer points out, not everyone greets it with open arms.

$3,500 v-till tool does the job

After seeing November’s vertical tillage, or v-till, articles, Karl Hess of Conestoga, Pa., shared his own experience. He purchased a used 14-foot disk harrow for $1,200 and converted it for vertical tillage in May 2008 — all for $3,300 to $3,500.

Opinions differ on spring vertical tillage

If you attended the National Farm Machinery Show in Louisville, Ky., you likely noticed that vertical tillage tools are a hot commodity. How can the tool that at first glance looks like a highly over-priced disk help you do a more effective job of getting planting off to a good start this spring?

Vertical-tillage interest reaches a fever pitch

"Vertical tillage is just a fad,” a neighbor said recently. “It won’t be around long.”

Vertical tillage is not no-till

Iowa conservationists with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service are disturbed by the number of row crop farmers using vertical-tillage tools. Vertical tillage often leaves the soil covered with crop residue, but it is not the same as true no-till.