• Curt Arens

    Highway litter cleanup makes impression on farm kids

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on April 8, 2015

    On Easter Monday, it has been a tradition with our 4-H club over the past decade or so to cleanup a three mile stretch of county highway that runs very near to our farmstead. Now into the second generation in the club to walk these same ditches for trash, it is interesting how important this act of community service has become to our 4-H members, past and present. This past Monday, our club members and their parents braved a cool, driving drizzle, toting trash bags and caps and coats, to walk…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Who spends more on conservation: Ducks Unlimited or farmers?

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on April 7, 2015

    It burned my butt the other day to see that Ducks Unlimited got so much praise for pledging to spend $1.8 million more a year for the next five on conservation in South Dakota over the next five years. Related: Conservation can be profitable, too The $9 million pledge represents up to a 40% increase in the organization's spending in the state, said Ducks Unlimited South Dakota manager of conservation programs Steve Donovan, in a report published and broadcast widely in…

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  • Paula Mohr

    Metro is clueless about conservation

    Northstar Notes

     by Paula Mohr
     on March 18, 2015

    Gov. Mark Dayton's proposed buffer strip legislation is getting lots of media attention as lawmakers, farm organization and environmental groups wrestle with how to protect Minnesota's water quality. The governor's bill would require at least 50 feet of perennial vegetation to surround Minnesota’s lakes, rivers and streams. According to a downloadable  fact sheet provided by the governor's office, the bill does not alter existing shoreland rules or drainage law. It…

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  • Don McCabe

    Discover the biological action occurring in your soil

    Nebraska Notebook

     by Don McCabe
     on February 27, 2015

    Our preferences for off hours in this country usually center around "action" more so than relaxation. We like sports action and action movies, for instance. But those forms of entertainment pale in comparison with the biological activity occurring, or should be occurring, in the soil on our farms. It's a real jungle down there. And there's more of this live action in healthy soils than soils that are tilled and where limited rotations or monoculture occur. The concepts of…

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  • Tim White

    Ohio Farmer Thanks No-Till Council

    Buckeye Farm Beat

     by Tim White
     on December 17, 2014

    Of course slugs came up. It was a no-till meeting. They didn't come up until nearly the end of the annual meeting of the Ohio No-till Council earlier this month at Der Dutchman in Plain City. And the comment came pretty quickly from somewhere in the crowd, "Beer works good for us, but some years we just don't have enough beer to kill 'em." This meeting had it all. There were stories about successfully planting into a 12-foot-tall rye cover. No one asked why.  There…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Pheasants, Farmers & Ranchers -- More To The Story Of Habitat Change

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on December 5, 2014

    I am proud of Eric Johannsen. The other day, the Tolstoy, S.D., farmer and rancher told to a group of newspaper, outdoor and hunting writers not to demonize farmers for converting Conservation Reserve Program acres and pasture to cropland. “They are still strictly trying to meet a demand and the demand has been there, and it is a world demand…extreme world demand,” he said. While some ag critics believe that in recent years federal crop insurance has been too generous and…

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  • Mike and Sheilah Reskovac

    Digging Into The Compost Biz

    Two Hearts, One Harvest

     by Mike and Sheilah Reskovac
     on September 26, 2014

    During lunchtime about a year ago, Mike asked Sheilah what she thought about getting into the composting business. Here's how their conversation evolved. Sheilah: What do you mean what do I think about it? Don’t you think you have enough to do all ready? Mike: Yeah, but what if we're getting paid to do it? Sheilah: Well, that’s a different story. Tell me more. Mike:  A Pennsylvania Resource Council rep had been trying to get me interested in composting for several…

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  • Rod Swoboda

    Ready For Radishes?

    Iowa Farm Scene

     by Rod Swoboda
     on June 27, 2014

    A few years ago, before cover cropping came on the scene here in corn-soybean country, if you'd have told me Iowa farmers would be planting fields and fields of radishes, I would have looked at you funny. Mark Korte, a farmer in Pocahontas County in northwest Iowa, gives this simple explanation for planting 500 acres of radishes last summer. "I wanted to try them, as a cover crop," he says. "I'd read about radishes for quite a while. When we had to use prevented planting…

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  • P.J. Griekspoor

    Saying Goodbye to a Leader in Ag World

    Kansas Viewpoint

     by P.J. Griekspoor
     on June 13, 2014

    We say it all the time. You never know how much time you have left. Sometimes, things happen that remind you how true that is. On Sunday,June 8, one of those things happened. Roger Brining, who happens to have the distinction of being the Barton County farmer in the cover photograph of my very first edition as editor of Kansas Farmer, died when his open-cockpit, experimental airplane crashed just north of the Great Bend airport shortly before noon. Roger was a creative and progressive…

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  • Curt Arens

    Planting Cover Crops Is Not An Exact Science

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on June 10, 2014

    At last week’s No-till on the Plains whirlwind tour stop at Matt Kathol’s farm near Hartington, the farmer discussions with no-till experts and technicians were telling (See gallery slideshow below). No-till farmers are generally quite committed to a philosophy that includes absolutely no tillage of their cropland soils. As University of Nebraska Extension engineer, Paul Jasa said so eloquently, “No-till is not just a planter. It is a systems approach to crop…

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