• Curt Arens

    Carrying Out a Drought Plan Can Be Painful

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on July 25, 2012

    This past Friday was a tough day. I had been dreading the day for some time, although I knew it was coming up on the horizon. With each passing day of extreme heat and no rain, I watched my paddocks of grass dry and turn into nothing more than kindling for a fire. Warm season pastures that normally carried my small herd through the hottest of summer months never materialized. Cool season grasses that greened up early this season, provided some April grazing, but fizzled out in the summer sun…

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  • Curt Arens

    Accepting Drought and Making Plans

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on July 17, 2012

    They say that acceptance of the problem is the first step in dealing with it. I suppose that could be said of an addiction or of drought. I think over the past few weeks, many farmers have been in denial. We’ve kept our eyes upward, hoping and praying for a crop-saving rain. But, as I spoke with my neighbors and farming friends over the past week, I’ve noticed a marked change in attitude. Most of the farmers have given up the anxiety of waiting for rain. They have come to the…

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  • Curt Arens

    Silver Lining: Top 10 Good Things About Drought

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on July 10, 2012

    Yes, it is one of the driest years on record for many of us. Yes, it has thus far been one of the hottest summers any of us can recall. There is no grass. Hay is high priced and almost completely unavailable. But hey, I still have my health. And besides, even in the drought of the Dirty Thirties, my grandparents held barn dances, farm couples got married, had children and life went on. They had fun and found humor in their disaster. Years ago, I interviewed John Leader, an upbeat, lively…

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  • Curt Arens

    Drought, Short Pastures, Less Hay Combine to Make Perfect Storm

    Husker Home Place

     by Curt Arens
     on July 3, 2012

    Who are we kidding anyway? We should have predicted this situation. High grain prices drive some farmers to tear up every acre to get the most out of high priced land. In some areas, thousands of acres of pasture and grazing land were planted to row crops this spring. Farmers in many parts of the state opted to tear up alfalfa or plant fewer acres of new seeding alfalfa, to make room for corn and soybeans. In USDA’s June 1 acreage report, planted acres of corn reached an 80-year high at…

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