• Lon Tonneson

    Northern N.D. -- The New Cornbelt?

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 29, 2010

    Look for 70- to 75-day corn that could average 200 bushels per acre in northern North Dakota by 2015. He’s says a Syngenta plant breeder predicted at recent industry meeting that genetic improvements will move the Cornbelt into northern North Dakota and southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan within 10 years. “We’ll have some 200-bushel averages across whole farms in the southern Valley this year,” says Oberlander, who is one of the principals behind a new seed company…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Vilsack Knows North Dakota

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 15, 2010

    U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack proved he knows geography when he spoke at Big Iron recently. He was at the the West Fargo, N.D., farm show and at a forum was asked whether big oil is still fighting ethanol.  “Let see,” he said after a short pause, “I’m in North Dakota, the fourth largest oil producing state, and I’m in front of a bunch of farmers…” He went on to say that he “hopes” big oil now sees ethanol as a…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Bart Schott: Let it stand

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 7, 2010

    I saw Bart Schott, of Kulm, N.D., at the Farm Progress Show in Boone, Iowa, last week Schott is the current vice president of the National Corn Growers Association. One of the last times I saw Schott he was in a cornfield in late October, cleaning the snow off his combine. "Not going to have to combine in the snow this year," I said. "Probably not," he said, "But we’re not afraid of it anymore." The 30% moisture corn Schott had left in the field last year and combined in the spring…

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  • Lon Tonneson

    Machinery costs and farm size

    Inside Dakota Ag

     by Lon Tonneson
     on September 3, 2010

    Just got back from the Farm Progress Show in Boone, Iowa. All the new equipment and technology on display was mind-blowing. But so were the prices. As I worked my sector of the show, gathering new product information for features that we’ll run in the Dakota Farmer and its sister publications later this year, I kept writing down the “K” figure -- $180K for $180,000, for example. More than once I had to ask if I heard the price correctly -- was it 6K or $60K, $25K or…

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