• Tyler Harris

    Off The Beaten Path

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on April 26, 2013

    One of the reasons I love my job is the hidden gems I find while traveling for an interview – things you won't find by simply driving on the interstate. This might be a Red Dirt radio station in the Flint Hills or a small-town diner in the Ozarks. This week, a meeting and field day took me to Weston, Missouri. I had been to Weston before, since it's only 30 minutes north of where I live in Kansas City. At one point in the 1800s, the town's population rivaled Kansas…

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  • Tyler Harris

    Honoring the Hands That Feed Us

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on April 19, 2013

    I've driven by the Agricultural Hall of Fame in Bonner Springs, Kansas, numerous times while driving on I-70, but until today – the first day it opened for the visitor season, I hadn't actually visited it. The Hall of Fame surrounded by a suburb of Kansas City, honors individuals throughout history who have made a significant impact on U.S. agriculture, and raising consumer awareness on the importance and influence of agriculture. The message is simple: "If you eat…

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  • Tyler Harris

    The Main Street of America and the West

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on April 12, 2013

    Last Saturday I had the opportunity to visit with some victims of cattle theft in southwest Missouri, specifically near Joplin, which will be in the Missouri Ruralist in the future. The drive from Joplin to where I live in north Kansas City is over two and a half hours, so I thought I would do some sight-seeing on the trip home. Having heard of the history of the town of Baxter Springs, Kansas, just 20 minutes from Joplin, I decided to check it out. With their proximity to Oklahoma, the…

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  • Tyler Harris

    A "Retro-Futuristic" View of Farming

    Town and Country

     by Tyler Harris
     on April 5, 2013

    Looking through back issues of Kansas Farmer in the past week, I read through one of the most important eras in agricultural history – the "Green Revolution," as it was named in 1968. The revolution was spearheaded by Norman Borlaug in the early 1940s, followed by major innovations in the 50s and 60s. These innovations include the widespread adoption of tractors – which outnumbered horses by 1954, and the use of high yield varieties, pesticides, fertilizers and…

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